Robert Micajah Powell

b. 23 September 1826, d. 15 January 1916

Robert Micajah Powell, 1827-1916
  • Robert Micajah Powell was born on 23 September 1826 in Montgomery, Alabama.
  • He was known as Mike.
  • Robert Micajah Powell wrote to Elizabeth Green Wood:
         Brenham Texas - Nov. 21 - 1849
    Miss Lizzie
         I have intruded myself upon your attention the third time since I heard from you. Yours of August was the last. Why I have not received any from you since that time I don’t know nor will I stop to inquire. The reasons why I wrote the first still exist and prompts [me] to write this. Silence or distance can not deter me from so delightful a task. It is almost my only pleasure, and there is but one thing that will cause me to cease & that is your will, with me it is supreme – and your pleasure is of the highest consideration with me. True the heart is not so happy and the feelings so buoyant after a long and protracted silence as when I am in the possession of a welcome messenger from you, yet I have learned to calculate upon circumstances, convenience and accident. Even now it may be that you are thinking me a false flatterer and deceiver. If you are, charge it all to Genl. Taylor, for I have written twice before this. Yet other obstacles may have intervened that could not be obviated. Something has happened I know not what, but the heart involuntarily makes the inquiry, and there is not a voice west of Old Montgomery that can answer. I know not how to proceed. I have said much in former letters & the heart is now full, but how to transcribe its honest emotions upon paper I have yet to learn. Alone & in silence I can feel & realize its emotions of affection. When the duties of everyday are forgotten & I am surrounded by the poetry of love, it is then that I am happy. The future opens brightly before and any object reflects your own image and the halo of hope surrounds the imagery of love. For what was love given if it is not to be as enduring as life and flourish with heavenly beauty beyond death? It cannot be forgotten in at an unknown age day or year.
         If you leave Montgomery before the 1st of Dec. you will not receive this. Yet I hope it will be in time. If you should receive it, I hope you will dignify it by some token, anything from you would be most welcome. I am a stranger to the movements in M[ontgomery]. I have not received a letter from Dunk for three months. Why his silence I am unable to account for. I have the pleasure of receiving a little letter from my sister a few weeks ago, which is all. If all my Ala[bama] Friends have so soon forgotten me this soon I regret it, least wise take the privilege at any early day to remind them that Mike is alive & that I have not forgotten them. The memory of all my old and youthful friends is dear to me & I hope will ever be. This country affords no news of interest but if heaven would favour so much as to let me sit by you a few hours, perhaps I could tell you something interesting. At least it would be a very interesting position for me. I hope you will soon be here. Yet for your own happiness perhaps I ought not to wish it, for here you will be a stranger and for awhile deprived of the society & pleasures you are accustomed to enjoy. I have felt it much & you will necessarily feel it more, but when you do come no other country & no others society will have any charms for me. It is a sad event when all are about to bid adieu to home – the old & beloved home - now no more our home & to the friends & early associates. There is a ball in town tonight. I hear the fiddle now. I don’t think I shall go – this is the ninth week of court & I am very busy & feel remarkably dull, more so than usual. I am physically very feeble from constant & excessive application as I have the business of three attorneys to do this fall. Before you leave just give my respects to all. How is cousin Tom? I hope he has not driven the memory of myself entirely from your mind! Miss Lizzie I wish that I had something to say that would amuse your or interest you. Shall I tell the oft-repeated tale? To me it is a theme that is ever dear, one that angels sing for it presides over all human affairs, “Love rules the court, the camp, the grove, here on earth and saints above, for love is Heaven, & Heaven is love.” But perhaps you are tired of it. A kingdom at this moment for a thought acceptable to you. Miss Lizzie in the absence of anything from you I know not how or what to say. One thing is certain – that is I am here, the same thing. Time nor circumstances make no change in me. I love you just like I did when I left you. My path is a little gloomy now, for I have not heard a voice for sometime to cheer its silence but hope now looms up in the distance & cheers up the heart & makes her forget her loneliness. It is a pleasure to think of you and I should dispise my name and feel that I was a recreant deceiver if an hour was to pass and my heart fails to pay tribute to your memory, but all this you know & doubt not. All I ever had to offer you was a faithful and devoted heart that is still yours & to love you will be the business of my life, whatever may be our fates. So goodbye loved one – God bless & prosper you.
         I am still devotedly yours, R.M.P.
    Letter in private collection of B. M. Henwood, descendant of Mike and Lizzie Wood Powell; original transcription by R. E. Reichardt.
  • Elizabeth Green Wood wrote to Robert Micajah Powell:
    Mr P –
         Will you be astonished to receive this, or do you look for it? I know you think I’m an odd creature but you don’t know me yet. perhaps Time may show you what a harum scarum little girl I am. The day has at length arrived for the boys to leave. Today they start for the new home, leave friends and all old associations behind for new ones. I have taken up my abode in Town at Mr Snodgras'. I am very anxious for them to come, for me to leave – I am enjoying myself very much but still I had rather seen my friend in Texas, than attend all places of gaity. Maj Jenkins is in town now, & I am trying about as hard as a woman ever did to catch him. he is anxious to know if there is any intimacy between ourselves. of course I say not. There was a party at Dr Holt's last evening. you may know I did my prettiest to ensnare the gentleman with the interesting eyes. Sallie & Bet have been staying some time in town but the old folks carried them home this morning. I was down to see them early this morning. I think Puss could be going down very soon to see Bethire. How things have changed since you left. I expect you are posted up with all the affairs of the heart. I have at last made the acquaintance of Judge Felds and indeed I think he is an oddity. he is very anxious to give me a likeness that hangs out before Parks gallery. I go by there very often to see the picture but I can’t fancy that it is you although it is very like the original. Cousin Spaight is in town. of course I am engaged to him as my friends or gossipers are so kind as to give me all of my cousins – John Brown is to be married the first of next month to Sallie Murdock - I don’t envy her lot - for he is anything but smart - but her desires take with that family - I send you this dear little boquet – as an emblem of my love for you - I have never told you that before but you have been aware of for two years - I shall see you in 4 weeks from this time. it is a long long time for impatient. ------ I can’t expect to hear from you again as Duncan is going away. I’ll send this by mail as you’ll get it sooner
         Yours Truly, Lizzie G Wood
         Thursday morning Dec 7th ’49.
    Minimal punctuation added by the transcriber to enhance readability.
  • Eddie Eliza Campbell wrote to Evelina Barnes Wood on 10 February 1850, "I hope Duncan
    has settled now enough to Mr Wood to profit by his methodical and steady manner of doing business, and that he will profit by it. I promised to let you hear about the result of his business, I have enquired dilligently but no one would tell me, I only know that Dr Bolling bought Abby and all the children accept Tait, Col Carter bought him. Harry sold for only $150 that I felt very sorry for, and I know Duncan will be greatly disappointed. Mr Norton bought him. While I am upon Duncan’s affairs I cannot help alluding to his other affair, (as little as I feel like it). Betty Powell called upon Mr Farly for his picture, and he told her I had it. Sally came for it the next day she told us that her Mother and Father never said one word to her about discarding Duncan, so far from it they wished it to take place, and that what she done was before she knew the property was involved. And that she found her Sister loved him better than she did. (This accounts for her sisters unhappiness all last summer.) As for herself her feelings for him had never changed she loved him and should never engage herself to any one else. She said she could not understand how her Sister could engage herself to every one that that courted her. She trembled like an aspin leaf while she was talking and I could not help feeling very sorry for her. Sally’s conversation is confidential, I told her I had written to Duncan, I was not willing for him to marry Betty because she was engaged to so many. She said she sometimes thought Duncan loved her best. You can judge that he is in a dilema, and I see nothing for him to do but to get off with all of them. Sally evidently has sacrificed her feelings to her Sister. Mike is here. I have not seen him. . . . And give my love to. . . . Duncan & Willie though last not least, my prayers and best wishes will follow them were ever they go, tell them to be good industrious and persevering, in all they undertake."
  • Eddie Eliza Campbell wrote to Evelina Barnes Wood on 25 February 1850, "Mike Powell did not call to see us. I supposeSally told him what I had said, but I cant help it, if all concerned cut me, I must expect my disapprobation, and condemn Sallys romance which she must have read in some antiquated novel, that it was beautiful to make a sacrafice of her own affections and those of the man she professed to love, to a sister who can fall in love with every new face she meets with. I told Sally I was not willing for Duncan to marry Betty since I knew her own feelings had not changed. They are all in a dilema that I think they had better sett to work to get out off. Sally thinks Duncan loves her best, and fears that Betty loves him better than she is capable of doing. . . . Much love to Duncan and Willie, I hope to hear from them."
  • On Sunday, 22 September 1850, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "A beautiful day, all in fine health. Mr & Mrs Carothers, Green & Wife & Willis & wife & all their Children & Mr Powell spent the day with us."
  • On Monday, 18 October 1850, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Gave Mr R. M. Powell an order on Rice & Nichols for $24 for Willis B. Wood."
  • On Monday, 28 October 1850, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Gave Mr. R. M. Powell an order on Rice & Nichols for $24 for Willis B. Wood."
  • On Wednesday, 24 September 1851, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mr. R. M. Powell arrived here this morning."
  • He married Elizabeth Green Wood, daughter of Green Wood and Evelina Alexander Barnes, on 27 November 1851 in Montgomery County, Texas, at Greenwood plantation, by license issued on 5 November by H. B. Boston, with Presbyterian Minister Daniel Baker officiating.
  • On Saturday, 6 December 1851, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mr. M. Powell's negros came this evening."
  • John M. McGilvary and his wife Ellen sold 176 acres in the Joseph Lindley survey to R. M. Powell, by deed dated 17 January 1852, recorded 28 May 1852.
  • By deed dated 27 January 1852 in Montgomery County, Texas, John Martin McGilvary and his wife Ellen McGilvary of Montgomery County sold to Robert Micajah Powell for the sum of $880.00, 176 acres (deeded to them by Thomas W. and Elizabeth Hoy), in the Joseph Lindley headright league in Montgomery County. Witnessed by W. W. Robert and Thomas W. Hoy, recorded 28 May 1852, notary public Jonathan Stark Collard.
  • On Sunday, 11 April 1852, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Wm B. W. & Mr Powell Killed a Deer this evening."
  • On Saturday, 21 May 1852, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mr Powell killed a fine Buck -- He did!"
  • On Tuesday, 1 June 1852, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "The hoe hands hoe cotton for Mr Powell," and the following day, "the hoe hands finished hoeing over Mr Powell's cotton about 11 oclock."
  • On Sunday, 6 June 1852, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: Mr Abercrombie, Mr Hardy & Talbot McGar & Mr Randal [probably Dudley Randall] here to dinner, Mr Powell & Wm B. Wood brought plenty of fish & a venison from the lake for Dinner.
  • On Tuesday, 22 June 1852, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "R. M. Powell quite sick."
  • On Thursday, 8 July 1852, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs Wood & Ella, Mr Powell & Wm B. Wood all left for Huntsville at 5 oclock this morning," and on the following day, "Mrs Wood & all the rest returned from Huntsville."
  • On Wednesday, 18 August 1852, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Packed 3 Bales cotton for Willis Wood, Balance left 210 lb. Gined & packed two Bales cotton for Mr Powell by adding the Balance left of Willis Wood & 40 lb left of Mr Powell's."
  • On Monday, 23 August 1852, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mr Powell & Lizzie started this morning to Cincinnati Ohio," and on the same day, "Sent by Robert L. Wood to Wm M. Rice &c 3 Bales cotton for Willis Wood No. 1,2,3 7 2 for Mr. Powell No. 1,2."
  • On Saturday, 18 September 1852, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Hawled 4 loads of Mr Powell's cotton to the Gin," and on Tuesday, the 21st, "Packed 6 Bales cotton for Mr Powell. "
  • On Sunday, 28 November 1852, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mr R. M. Powell & Lizzie returned from Ohio this evening."
  • By deed dated 18 January 1853 in Walker County, Texas, William Nathan Lindley and his wife Martha J. Lindley of Walker County sold to Green Mark Wood of Walker County, for the sum of $2,000, two parcels of land (420.25 acres and 96.3 acres) in the John Sadler headright league in Walker County. Witnessed by F. B. Pankey and Robert Micajah Powell, recorded 27 January 1853, notary public Jonathan S. Collard.
         The 420.25 acre parcel was purchased from John Sadler by Samuel Washington Lindley and subsequently conveyed to his son William Lindley on 12 August 1848. The 96.2 acre parcel was purchased by William Lindley from John Sadler on 19 February 1849.
         Green Mark's purchase of this property involved a loan from F. B. Pankey, which specified that the larger parcel was "the land on which I reside," so apparently he was renting the property prior to the purchase. (Further research required.)
  • On Tuesday, 15 February 1853, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Packed some cotton for Mr Powell, and Thursday, the 17th, "Some hands cuting & Burning part of the day in Mr Powell's new ground."
  • After the death of Willis Breazeal Wood in 1854, Lizzie Green Wood's husband Robert Micajah Powell hired Jerry from the estate.
  • Evelina Wood wrote on 14 May 1855, to her daughter Lizzie Powell, undergoing treatment for cancer in Murfreesboro, Tennessee: ". . . Billie came up this evening to read the letters and took them to Josie, he intends writing to Mr Powell by this mail. Lewis says all well at his place. . . ." Letter in private collection of B. M. Henwood, descendant of Wm Wood Powell; original transcription by R. E. Reichardt.
  • Evelina Wood wrote on 14 May 1855, to her daughter Lizzie Powell, undergoing treatment for cancer in Murfreesboro, Tennessee: ". . . Give my love to Bettie, ask her to write to me and may God bless her forever for her goodness to my dear child. . . . Ella speaks of Bettie & George as if she had known them always -- I hope Sallie Barnett has returned to you ere this to relieve Bettie and Mr Powell some -- I have every confidence in Mr Powell's doing every thing that can be done, I know he is one of the best nurses. . . ." Letter in private collection of B. M. Henwood, descendant of Wm Wood Powell; original transcription by R. E. Reichardt.
  • On Wednesday, 4 July 1855, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Billy and wife started to Galveston to Meet Mr. Powell and Lizzie, with two carriages and drivers." And on Monday, the 9th, "Billy, wife and all returned this evening with Mr. Powell and Lizzie and child and nurse, got home this evening."
  • Classified advertisements appeared during 1856 in The Huntsville Item under "Steam Mills" for J. Mitchell & R. M. Powell's circular saw-mill, and for T. Carothers' lumber & grist-mill.
  • Robert Micajah Powell became a widower at the 14 June 1856 death of his wife Elizabeth Green Wood.
  • On Wednesday, 16 July 1856, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs. Wood, Mrs. Campbell and the children and Mr. Powell left this evening on a visit to Abercrobie's and [Folks], Waverly." And on Monday, the 21st, "Mrs. W. and Mrs. Campbell returned home from their visit."
  • On Tuesday, 14 October 1856, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs. Wood, Mr. Powell, and Ella and Wood started on a visit to Mr. Fisher, C. Abercrombie's, and Mr. McGar and Colonel Yoakum."
  • On Monday, 20 October 1856, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent three waggons and Some Boys to Mr Powell,s to help him Hawl corn to Mr Wm Scott at the Carothers Place," and on the following day, "Sent three waggons with corn to Carothers place for Mr Powell."
  • On Friday, 19 December 1856, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Gave Daniel McArthur a Draft on E.B.N. &c for $247 to pay for the Jersey waggon bought by Mr. P."
  • Robert Micajah Powell represented Montgomery County, District 37, in the Texas House Representatives for the years 1857-1858.
  • On Thursday, 19 March 1857, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mr. Powell left for Alabama."
  • Green Wood recorded in his book of Misc. Financial & Slave Records, the account of R. M. Powell for the period October 1857 through February 1859, cash and various drafts (including one to S. A. Wood, presumably for R.M.P's payment for use of slaves belonging to Willis's estate) and taxes paid. Apparently offset against the Credit recorded 24 October 1857: 176 Acres of Land which he now Occupies, $2112.00."
  • On Thursday, 3 December 1857, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent to Mr P,s mill 24 Bushels corn."
  • On Saturday, 16 January 1858, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mr. Powell's Louis killed twelve hogs, weighed 1990 pounds."
  • On Thursday, 17 June 1858, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs Wood, Mr Powell with Ella & Wood left for Sour Lake this morning."
  • On Wednesday, 21 July 1858, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs W. & Mr Powell & children got home from the Sour Lake. All well."
  • On Saturday, 18 September 1858, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mr Powell left home to day for Austin," and on Monday, the 27th, R. M. Powell got home to dinner from Austin.
  • On Tuesday, 28 September 1858, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent off five bales of Mr Powell number 98, 99, 100, 101, 102."
  • On Saturday, 6 November 1858, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: Packed 18 Bales of cotton for Mr R. M. Powell. . . . Sent off . . . two Bales for Mr Powell."
  • On Wednesday, 16 November 1858, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent 4 Bales of Mr Powell's cotton by J. Sloan," and on the following day, "Sent off 6 bales of cotton for M. M. Powell by Mr W. C. Powers, No. to 16."
  • On Monday, 22 November 1858, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent off 6 Bales of Mr Powells cotton No. 17 to 22. . . ."
  • On Thursday, 2 December 1858, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Packed 2 Bales cotton for Mr Powell making 24 Bales."
  • On Thursday, 16 December 1858, Wm Barnes Wood, in Green Wood's absence, recorded: "Hawled 4 loads [of corn] to Mr Powell."
  • On Wednesday, 23 December 1858, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Packed eight Bales of cotton for Mr. Powell," and the following day, "Packed eleven Bales of cotton for Mr. Powell, making nineteen."
  • On a page in the back of Book 9 (1858-1859), Green Wood recorded: "Land Taxable Valuation. . . . 176 Acres Bought of R. M. Powell, (Hoy place) 2112.00," added below the total of his property taxes.
  • On 9 April 1859, Green Wood wrote to Robert Micajah Powell: R. M. Powell, Esq., Montgomery, Ala. Dear Mike, Your Ma [mother-in-law Evelina Wood] has given you the news generally so I will only write a business letter which I aught to have writen sooner but forgot about it.
         I wish you to see Elmore or Yancy and enquire of them about the suit against Myers on a note that he gave for corn which he conten9 April 1859ed fell short. I have never had any account of it. If you should see Bolling Hall enquire of him if it has been collected & if I have been credited on my note & if you do not see him enquire of Colonel Bugbee as he attends to such matters for Mrs Brown. I wrote to B. Hall once about it but got no answer. I would be glad you would make some enquiry about the chancery case of Genl Clanton.
         Every Body is well here and we are ahead of our last years work at least three weeks but our corn is not large but we shall be done thining Hoeing & plowing it very soon, say two three days. Your overseer is up with us if not ahead a fine stand of cotton. We have had a week of very cool weather, nothing could grow much but now warm enough.
         They are to have a Democratic meeting at Danville next Saturday. You will be a Delegate to the convention the 1st Monday in May at Houston. I expect Wm B. W. will write you.
         Yours Truly, Green Wood.
    Original letter in R. E. Reichardt collection; original transcription by R. E. Reichardt.
  • The following appeared on 27 April 1859 in The Houston Telegraph: The following gentlemen have been requested by his excelency H. R. Runnells, to represent Texas in the Southern Commercial Convention, which will assemble at Vicksburg, Miss., on the 9 day of May. Col. Jas. W. McDade and Frank Lipscomb Esq., of Austin county. . . . Hon. R. M. Powell of Montgomery. . . . Cols Geo. W. Chilton and R. B. Aubbard of Smith. Hon. A. P. Wiley and P. W. Kittrell of Walker. . . . The Governor, we understand, will extend his appointments to others at the suggestion of respectable parties in the State.-- State Gazette.
  • On Friday, 6 May 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mr. R. M. Powell returned home from Alabama last night."
  • On Thursday, 18 August 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs. Wood, Ella, Mr. Powell and Campbell left for Kellum Springs in company of Mrs. Scott and Miss Ella Scott," and on Saturday, the 27th, "Mrs. Wood and all others got home from Kellum Springs."
  • On Tuesday, 6 September 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mr. Powell started to Wharton County" [likely to visit his mother's widowed brother Robert McAlpin Williamson].
  • On Sunday, 9 October 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs. Wood and Mr. Powell and Ella returned today from a visit to friends on the Brazos and on the way got from the traps three fine Buffalo fish; one weighed twelve pounds."
  • On Monday, 17 October 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent seven hands to the Lake to put in Fish traps. Mr. P. and W. Campbell superintended."
  • On Wednesday, 16 November 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Packed 11 Bales cotton for R. M. Powell, making 22."
  • On Wednesday, 8 February 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Packed 1 Bale for Mr P's Louis."
  • On Thursday, 23 February 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Three hands at Mr. P."
  • On Friday, 16 March 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs. W. and Mr. Powell left yesterday for Huntsville; had a full benefit of the rain I suppose."
  • William Barnes Wood and Cornelia Josephine Mitchell appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1860 in Montgomery County, Texas. Other members of the household included Robert Micajah Powell, Evelina Wood and William Wood Powell. Robert M. Powell was the widower of William Barnes' sister Elizabeth Green Wood.
  • He was a farmer, according to the 1860 census.
  • Robert Micajah Powell appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1860 Robert M. Powell is listed in the 1860 Slave Schedule with 35 slaves (17 of whom were age 10 or younger, and none age 60 and older) and 8 slave houses, for an average of 4-5 persons per cabin.
  • On Monday, 4 June 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mr. Powell left for Wharton County this morning."
  • On Monday, 11 June 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Nine hands selecting & sawing timber for shingles, the other hands hoeing at Mr. Powell's," and the following day, "Sawing Shingle blocks with six hands, the other hands at Mr. Powell's."
  • On Monday, 18 June 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mr. Powell returned from Wharton county this morning 9 o'clock."
  • On Tuesday, 26 June 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent hands to help Mr. Powell raise his Gin house."
  • On Wednesday, 27 June 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs. Wood, Mr. Powell, Ella and Wood Powell and Wm B. W. and wife and daughter all left for Sour Lake." And on Monday, 1 July, "Bob returned from Sour Lake with the Waggon and six mules, left all well." On Monday, 9 July, "Started Bob with waggon and six mules to Sour Lake to bring the Bagage." And on Sunday, 15 July, "Mrs. Wood, Mr. Powell and the rest returned from Sour Lake. Mr. A. W. Speight and Lady came also.
  • On Friday, 29 June 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Hottest day. Still getting timber and boards, 2400 boards a day with six hands, boards for Mr. Powell's gin house."
  • On Thursday, 9 August 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Ginned for Mr. Powell yesterday evening and today," and on the following day, "Packed five Bales of cotton for Mr. Powell."
  • On Saturday, 25 August 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Packed five Bales of cotton for Mr. Powell, making ten Bales."
  • On Tuesday, 18 September 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Packed six Bales of cotton for R. M. Powell, making sixteen Bales," and on the following day, "Sent by Rodgers & Tarply eight bales of my cotton and two Bales of R. M. Powell's." On the 21st, "Sent four Bales of Mr. Powell's cotton by Mr. Abneys waggon to Allen & Fulton."
  • On Tuesday, 25 December 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "All the family here to dinner except Mr. Powell, and some friends."
  • On Saturday, 20 April 1861, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Dilcy & Mr Powell's Bob got married."
  • On Monday, 29 July 1861, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: Mr. Powell & his company left this morning for Virginia. Campbell Wood went off in fine spirits for the war. . . . Bob & Ben went with the waggon to Hempstead to carry Bagage.
         We must remember that Campbell was a youngster of eighteen, fresh from his training at Texas Military Institute.
  • See at the bottom of this page a summary of Col. R.M. Powell's CSA service record, generously provided by Bob Reichardt.
  • On Tuesday, 13 August 1861, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Started my Waggon (Ben driving) Doctor Campbell and Judge Goldthwaite Waggons to Nibletts Bluff Sabine river to meet Captain R. M. Powell & company & take them to Berwicks Bay."
  • On 30 August 1861, William Douglass Mitchell wrote to Bolling Hall Jr.:
         Cold Springs, Aug 30th /61.
    My Dear Uncle,
         As I have an opportunity of sending a letter directly to you by Mr Clepper who is en route for the seat of War in Virginia, as a volunteer in Col Terries regiment of mounted rangers, I will drop you a line. The war feeling engrosses the attention of all here, we hear of nothing but war and rumours of wars. Our county has sent two hundred men to Virginia and have two companies, one of Artilery and one of Cavalry, in the state, for confederate Service, so you see although we are in the back woods, we know our duties as patriotic citizens and members of the Southern Confedracy. Leroy left for virginia a week ago in Mr Powels Company, which is one of the twenty companies called for from this State by the President. My Father is now living in Robertson County on the Brazos. He was well when I heard from him. Charlie is married and living near me, he is doing well. Brother James is living in Grimes County in the Mill business, he is doing only tolerably well. Our Crops of corn were never better than they are this year. The Cotton crop will not be a good average crop owing to dry weather, from ten to twelve hundred per acre will be an average of this county. I received a letter from Josephine a few days ago, she states that all were well but that they had had a great deal of sickness in their family. Major Wood is suffering a great deal with inflamation of the eyes it is thought he will loose his sight. I have intended for some time to write to you on the subject of Margret Bailies Estate, have the heirs of my Mother any interest in that Estate, if not please let me know, by what act they have been debarred I would be glad to hear from you occasionally, and from my other relatives in Alabama. My warmest regards to all of my friends and believe me ever yours, Affectionately
              W. D. Mitchell
    Minimal punctuation added by the transcriber to enhance readability.
  • Captain "Mike" Powell wrote to his young sister-in-law Ella Wood on 6 April 1862, from Camp Wigfall, near Fredericksburg, Virginia. He ended the four-page letter, "We are all enjoying fine health now & are very anxious to see Lt. Hill return with our recruits. Your bro' Campbell is getting very fat, Bose not so fat as he used to be, & Pete Williamson looks like a Dutchman that drank a gallon of Lager beer every day. We all want to go home very much but not until the war is over. If I never come home you must tell Wood that you are to take care of him & that he must love you & wait on you as long as he lives, & when war comes he must fight for his country & not stay at home. Give my love to your father and mother & all the family, Your Bro' Mike."
  • On Monday, 7 April 1862, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Capt. Wooldridge & company left this morning. Started a Waggon Ben (Harris) driving to red river Alexandria with Lieut. Hill and his recruits for Capt. Powell's company." And on Sunday, the 27th, "Ben got back with waggon from Alexandria, Lieut. Hill & [illegible], 3 weeks trip."
  • On 26 February 1863, W. B."Bose" Campbell wrote home from near Richmond, Virginia, to his aunt Evelina Wood in Montgomery County, Texas: ". . . The boys are generally very healthy. Dick Hardy is
    fat and looking fine. George Yoakum ought to have
    a discharge, he is in Richmond with the scrofula.
    Creed Woodson is also there with a disease of the
    kidneys. Wm. Lewis is in camp fat as a bear.
    I gave the things to Fuller. He is very proud of them
    and is under many obligations to you. I have not
    seen Stanton yet. I have fallen off ten pounds
    since I have been to camp. I cant say much
    for my self as I love home too much ever to be satisfied
    any where else. . . ."
  • On Monday, 25 May 1863, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Done 1/2 days Grinding at Mr. P. Mill."
  • On Monday, 28 December 1863, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Let Billy have the two Ox wagons to Haul Mr. Powell's cotton to Huntsville."
  • He married Elizabeth Grace on 30 January 1865 in Baltimore, Maryland, at the Basilica of the Assumption B.V.M, 408 North Charles Street.
  • On 26 June 1865, in Campbell Courthouse, Virginia, Thomas Jewett Goree wrote in his travel diary: "At the time of Genl. Lee's surrender I was quite unwell and so could not start for Texas with Pleasant and others who were going home. I thought that by the time I was well enough to travel it would be difficult to find company going south and to travel alone in the unsettled state of the country would be too dangerous. So decided to send my horse on the Texas and go to Lynchburg and remain a while and then try to get home via N. York, N. Orleans, Galveston &c. I was encouraged to this, too, by Genl. Longstreet who had decided to go to Texas and proposed this route for himself. The only difficulty in my way was the want of funds, but I thought by some means to overcome this. Col. Powellhis wife.
  • On Thursday, 2 November 1865, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent Carriage after Colonel Powell & Lady," and on Wednesday, the 15th, "Sent Carriage for R. M. Powell."
  • On Sunday, 19 November 1865, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Colonel R. M. Powell & Lady arrived Last Night," and on Sunday, the 26, "Mrs. Powell's Servant died this Evening."
  • On Saturday, 20 January 1866, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Killed 35 hogs [and] hung up two Boxes meat. Had help from Colonel Powell & Wm B. Wood. Cut up & spread out the meat in the yard."
  • Robert Micajah Powell and Elizabeth Grace appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1870 in Baltimore, Maryland, and one female servant.. Other members of the household included William Wood Powell and George Francis Powell.
  • He was a merchant, according to the 1870 census.
  • Both Robert Micajah Powell and John Archibald Campbell were enumerated in the 1870 and 1880 censuses in Baltimore, Maryland. Mike Powell maternal grandfather Peter Ballentine Williamson was the brother of J. A. Campbell's mother Mary Williamson.
  • Robert Micajah Powell and Elizabeth Grace appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1880 in Baltimore, Maryland, at 51 Mosher Street with two female servants.. Other members of the household included George Francis Powell and Florence Nancy Powell.
  • He was a cotton broker, according to the 1880 census.
  • Robert Micajah Powell appeared in the 1896 St. Louis, Missouri, City Directory at 4044 Finney Avenue.
  • Robert Micajah Powell and Elizabeth Grace appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1900 in St. Louis, Missouri, at 4062 Morgan Street. Other members of the household included George Francis Powell and Florence Nancy Powell.
  • He was a retired planter, according to the 1900 census.
  • Robert Micajah Powell appeared in the '1901-1906 St. Louis, Missouri, City Directory at 4062 Morgan.
  • Robert Micajah Powell appeared in the '1907 & 1908 St. Louis, Missouri, City Directory at 4314 Maryland Avenue.
  • On 9 September 1908, Robert Micajah Powell wrote to Evelyn Lee Campbell: 5260A McPherson ave, Apr 9 - 1908. Dear Evelyn, Note the above new address. We moved our residence last week. We are in a Flat & George & his wife occupy the adjoining one, the young people wanted to try house keeping. we are two families, each in its separate quarters a porch in front serves each apartment, a meeting ground & a way to communicate with each other at any & all hours. I read the great number of the Houston Post of Sept 1st. I credit you with the kind & thoughtful rememberance, altho your Mother's hand inscribed the address on the package -- I enjoyed every word of the wonderful record of the growth of Texas. So many new towns everywhere. The claim of 9,000 inhabitants of Houston surprises me, altho I have always believed in its growth, yet it has come a little sooner than I expected. It is bound to be the principal City of Texas, has just begun to grow. He is fortunate who owns a few feet of its historic soil. When you write give me Sarah's address. I have lost her & I miss her delightful letters. I inclose you my letter to the old boys at the reunion at Jacksonville -- Put it in your scrap Book & Some day hence -- say fifty years you will wonder what it means. Where are the people to whom it was written. In a few days I will be 82 years old & I am under the dominion of my years & I have to be obedient to their exactons. The family tradition gives me two more years to live. I keep well but of very little account. Give my love to your mother, father, Billy, Josie -- all of our people & an abundance to yourself. Your Uncle Mike.
  • Robert Micajah Powell and Elizabeth Grace appeared in the US federal census of 15 April 1910 in St. Louis, Missouri, at 5076 Morgan Street living either next to or with their son George and his family.
  • On 24 July 1913, Robert Micajah Powell wrote to Ella Abercrombie Wood: 4440 Maryland ave, July 24th. Dear Ella, Your letter just arrived. My anxiety relieved. Oh !! These little mothers! They are the source & fount of new life & inspiration. They bring grand mothers in their KingDom. There is brightness & joy & all the new love centres on one little mite of humanity. Bess joins in love and congratulations. I read your letter inclosing the clipping, Campbells letter was so kind & sweet of him. It informed old friends & comrades that I am still living where I lived. Some of the old boys have seen it, written me nice letters. Had a card from Campbell this morning in your letter -- Florence is living happily in her Kentucky home, where the Stork is expected some months latter -- Bessie will go to her about the first of August. We have had a long dry hot spell -- But there has been rain, the temperature moderated. The heat distresst me, but I got through all right -- am in fairly good health -- Regret the hard times in Lina's life. Tell her there is too much for her to live for & she ought to have more regard for her health -- Trouble & sorrow seem to persecute Robert Hill & family -- poor Lizzie, not much sunshine in her life -- Captain Hill wrote me about Robert -- a sad letter -- Our Babies keep well. They are a noisy & an enterprizing gang -- I never see or hear from Woods children, they walk on the other side of the street to avoid me -- Glad Evelyn gave her daughter the Traditional name -- Congratulations to Papa Doc -- Love to all, Your Bro Mike.
         Minimal punctuation added by the transcriber to enhance readability.
  • Robert Micajah Powell appeared in the 1914 St. Louis, Missouri, City Directory at 4440 Maryland Avenue.
  • Robert Micajah Powell died on 15 January 1916 at age 89 in St. Louis, Missouri, at 4440 Maryland Avenue at the home of his son George.
  • His wife Elizabeth Grace became a widow at his death.
  • He was buried at Calvary Cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri.
  • The following appeared on 16 January 1916 in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch: [Died] At the residence of his son George F. Powell, 4440 Maryland Avenue; on Saturday, January 15, 1916, at 1 am, Col. R.M. Powell. Funeral from St. Louis Cathedral at 9 o'clock Monday morning Jan. 17, 1916. Galveston and Houston (Tex.) papers please copy.
  • The following appeared on 17 January 1916 in The St. Louis Republic: The funeral of Col. Robert M. Powell, 89 years old, veteran commander of Hood's Fifth Texas Brigade in the Confederate Army who died from bronchial pneumonia early Saturday morning, will be held this morning at the New Cathedral. Burial will be in Calvary Cemetery.
         Col. Powell came to St. Louis in 1882, following his marriage. He carried wounds received in the battle of Gettysburg, with which he lay for 48 hours on the field. Before the war he had served two terms in the Texas Legislature. His wife, a son, George F. Powell, and a daughter, Mrs. Florence Powell Gay, survive him.
  • The life and military career of Col. Micajah Powell have been extensively researched by Robert Esson Reichardt, whose wife Patricia Powell is a descendant of Col. Powell and his second wife Elizabeth Grace.  Bob's articles published in The Herald, journal of the Montgomery County [Texas] Genealogical & Historical Society, include "A Brief Biography of Robert Micajah Powell, Colonel, 5th Texas Infantry, CSA" (Summer 2004) and "Colonel Robert Micajah Powell, 5th Texas Infantry, CSA, The Texas Years" (Spring/Summer 2008). The Herald  is available in most major genealogical libraries in Texas, and also may be ordered at your local library through Interlibrary Loan. 
         He has made a substantial contribution of Col. Powell's family and military letters, transcriptions of those letters, photos, newspaper articles and military documents, to The Gregory A. Coco Collection, Gettysburg National Military Park Library. In 2007 he published the book, Forever The Cause: The Life and Legacy of Confederate Colonel Robert M. Powell, 5th Texas Infantry, with the innovative publisher Lulu Press, which allows updating by the author as necessary.

    Photographs and letters are used here, with permission, from the private collections of H. D. Ponton, B. M. Henwood and R. E. Reichardt.
  • For additional biographical information, see The Handbook of Texas Online.
  • Service Record of Colonel Robert Micajah Powell, CSA - by Robert Esson Reichardt
         Robert M. Powell was first appointed by his men as Captain of Company D, 5th Texas Infantry Regiment. In September 1861, near Richmond, Virginia, the 5th Texas was assigned to Hood’s Texas Brigade, Longstreet’s 1st Corps, Army of Northern Virginia.
         Captain Powell commanded Company D at the Battle of Eltham’s Landing, May, 1862;
         Captain Powell commanded Company D at the Battle of Seven Pines, late May-early June 1962;
         Captain Powell was ill and did not participate in either the Battle of Gaines Mill or the Seven Days Battles;
         In August 1862 he was appointed to the 5th Texas headquarters staff as its Major. In that capacity he fought at 2nd Manassas;
         In September 1862 he was appointed Lt. Colonel of the 5th Texas. In that capacity fought at Sharpsburg;
         On November 1, 1862, he took command of the 5th Texas as its colonel. As Colonel of the 5th Texas, he commanded the regiment at Fredericksburg in December 1862;
         Colonel Powell commanded the regiment on the Suffolk (Virginia) foraging campaign in April and June of 1863. The regiment did not return from Suffolk in time to participate in the Battle of Chancellorsville, returning to Lee’s army 10 days after the conclusion of that battle;
         Colonel Powell commanded the regiment as it journeyed north into Pennsylvania in late June 1863. That movement culminated in the Battle of Gettysburg. Colonel Powell was wounded there on July 2, 1863, at Little Round Top. Because he was too severely wounded to be moved, was taken prisoner at the conclusion of the fighting. He convalesced in various hospital locations in Gettysburg, being transferred to Ft. McHenry, Baltimore, Maryland, on August 21, 1863;
         After spending nearly six weeks in a hospital in Baltimore, he was transferred to the Federal prisoner-of-war camp at Johnson’s Island, Sandusky, Ohio, on September 31, 1863. There he would spend the next 16 months, until exchanged in late January 1865;
         After his exchange, Colonel Powell immediately took command of the Texas Brigade, as he was now the senior colonel in the field. The Brigade was positioned on the northern end of the Confederate line that at that time extended from Petersburg to Richmond;
         In April 1865 Colonel Powell commanded the Texas Brigade when it became Lee’s rear guard in the retreat westward from the brigade's camp to Appomattox Courthouse, Virginia;
         On Wednesday, April 12, 1865, Colonel Powell formally surrendered, along with 616 other members of the Texas Brigade. At the time of the surrender, there remained only 161 officers and enlisted men of the 5th Texas, including only 11 of the original 100 men in Company D.
  • Last Edited: 5 Aug 2015

Family 1: Elizabeth Green Wood b. 26 June 1832, d. 14 June 1856

Family 2: Elizabeth Grace b. May 1835, d. 7 February 1922