Green Mark Wood

b. 7 September 1814, d. 5 March 1898

Green Mark Wood, 1814-1898
  • Green Mark Wood was born on 7 September 1814 in Jefferson County, Georgia.
  • According to a transcription of the 1823 Alabama legislature House Journal, (Friday, November 21): Mr. Fitts obtained leave to introduce a bill, to be entitled "An act to alter the name of Green Hollinger to that of Green Mark Wood" which was read a first time, and ordered to be read a second time on to-morrow. And then the House adjourned till to-morrow 10 o'clock. (There appears to be no further mention of the subject, on the 22nd or the 25th.)
  • Green Wood and Evelina Alexander Barnes appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1830 in Montgomery County, Alabama. Other (counted but unnamed) members of the household apparently included Green Mark Wood, Solomon Eason Wood and Willis Breazeal Wood. Also in the household were forty-two slaves, nine of whom were under age ten and two age fifty-five and older.
  • According to a transcription of Auditor's Office vouchers, dated 25 April 1831, Green Mark Wood was a candidate for admission to the University of Alabama. On 18 April 1831, inaugural ceremonies marked the opening of the University, and by 28 May, 52 students had enrolled.
  • Green Mark Wood attended the University of Alabama, 1831-1836, in the Junior class at time of withdrawal.
  • By an act of the Alabama Legislature approved on 30 December 1834, the name of Green Mark Hollinger was changed to Green Mark Wood, who was made capable in law of inheritance as heir of Green Wood, of Montgomery County.
  • Green Mark's descendants treasure a small oval miniature portrait, oil on ivory, dated 1837 and attributed to Joseph Thoits Moore, currently in the family collection of George Mark Wood Jr., grandson of Green Mark's son Milton LeGrand Wood. A copy of the miniature, made by M. L. Frierson (Lake Charles, Louisiana) was commissioned by George Mark Wood Jr. as a gift for his sister Sallie Watkins Wood Millsap.
    Green Mark Wood miniature, pinxit 1837, attributed to Joseph Thoits Moore
    Green Mark Wood miniature, 1837, attributed to J T Moore, copy by M L Frierson, Lake Charles, Louisiana
  • Green Wood and Evelina Alexander Barnes appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1840 in Montgomery County, Alabama. Other (counted but unnamed) members of the household apparently included Green Mark Wood, Willis Breazeal Wood, William Barnes Wood, Joshua Wood and Elizabeth Green Wood. Also in the household were eighty-eight slaves, thirty-one of whom were under age ten.
  • He married Mary Jane LeGrand, daughter of William Chambers LeGrand and Jane Green Paul, on 9 April 1846 in Tuskegee, Macon County, Alabama, with Theodore W. Brevard officiating.
  • Green Mark Wood advertised his plantation for sale in the Montgomery, Alabama, Tri-Weekly Flag & Advertiser from May 1847 through March 1848.
  • Green Wood recorded: (in February 1850 in his first Texas plantation daily account book) "Started my waggons under the Care of Green M. Wood & Willis B. Wood for Texas on the 6th day of December 1849, 3 large waggons with 6 mules each, two waggons with 4 each, and one with two mares. Lost by cholria after crossing the Mississippi 13 Negros in the month of January 1850 viz Little Sam, Dave, Warren, Toby, Young Bill, Neptune, Turner, Harry, Alesey, Darcas, Pleasants youngest child Butler, Patseys child Flora & Ferabas child Elbert. [H]ad to camp for four weeks, did not arrive at my place near Danville, Montgomery County, Texas, untill the 3rd of February, 1850 & left three large waggons near Naches river & Guilford & his Family, 15 in all. Did not get them home untill the 10th of March, Got Adams Family & Leanty home from Houston on the 20th March."
  • According to an account written by Green Mark Wood's granddaughter Cornelia LeGrand Wood Garvin, the first place they lived after reaching Texas was the old Sharp Whitley place. This they rented for two years, Danville Texas being their post office. Then he bought 1000 acres of land paying $1.00 per acre, then in Walker County but now San Jacinto. Here they lived only one year. Then they moved to or near New Waverly, where they were living when son Rush Brevard enlisted in the Army in March 1864.
  • On Thursday, 9 May 1850, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Hawled 7 loads of corn from Danville & 2 yesterday, making 9 with Green's waggon, 25 Bushels each."
  • On Sunday, 26 May 1850, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "A very fine day, had Green & wife & Rush to dinner."
  • Green Mark Wood and Mary Jane LeGrand appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1850 in Walker County, Texas, near Danville.. Other members of the household included Rush Brevard Wood and Solomon William Wood.
  • He was a farmer, according to the 1850 census.
  • On Saturday, 8 June 1850, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Hawled 4 Loads of corn from Danville, making 21 loads hawled from that crib in Green's Waggon."
  • On Sunday, 30 June 1850, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Green M. Wood & wife & children & Willis B. Wood wife children & Duncan G. Campbell all Dined with us to day at the new place."
  • On Sunday, 4 August 1850, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "As usual Green & his wife & children spent the day with us."
  • On Wednesday, 7 August 1850, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Hawling corn from Carothers place & one from Green's."
  • On Thursday, 8 August 1850, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "W. B. Wood & Green went to Colonel Carothers to look at the thicket land."
  • On Sunday, 8 September 1850, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "A very pleasant day. Green & Willis & their Familys Spent the day here."
  • On Sunday, 22 September 1850, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "A beautiful day, all in fine health. Mr & Mrs Carothers, Green & Wife & Willis & wife & all their Children & Mr Powell spent the day with us."
  • On Friday, 1 November 1850, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent Cotton Pickers [to] help Green M. Wood pick out his cotton," and on the following day, "Cotton Pickers at G. M. Wood's."
  • On Sunday, 3 November 1850, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "G. M. & W. B. Wood & their familey's with us & some Gentlemen from Grimes County."
  • On Sunday, 19 January 1851, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Advanced G. M. Wood $40 on his cotton, charged in his account."
  • On Wednesday, 19 February 1851, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Packed 9 Bales of cotton for G. M. Wood."
  • On Saturday, 3 May 1851, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs. Abercrombie spent the week with us. " And on the following day, "Had Mrs. & Mr. Abercrombie, Mrs & Mr [Thomas] Carothers, G. M. Wood and family and Willis B. Wood to dinner with us. Mr. A. and family returned home this evening." Noted above entry: "Paid Abercrombie 1 Barrel flour and 1 of pork, due him 1 Barrel pork yet."
  • On Sunday, 8 June 1851, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "G. M. Wood's family and Willis Wood and family spent last night and today with us, also Doctor Harris and J. R. Brown."
  • On Sunday, 6 July 1851, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent six hands up to G. M. Wood's to help him build," and on the following day, "Went down to thickett with Doctor Penick, visited Green's place and staid at night with Mr Landrum. On Monday, the 14th, "Six negro men still working for G. M. Wood, the rest of the hands pulling fodder."
  • On Monday, 18 August 1851, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent Sam and Peter to work for G. M. Wood at Thickett."
  • On Tuesday, 16 September 1851, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent Joe to help G. M. Wood move to Thickett," and on Saturday, the 20th, "Joe returned from G. M. Wood this morning, pedlar waggon hounds broke."
  • On Tuesday, 23 September 1851, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Green M. Wood and Sam Landram took lodging with us."
  • On Sunday, 1 February 1852, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Wm B. Wood went on a visit to G. M. Wood," and on the following day, "Sent Saten and John to G. M. Wood to help him fence his ground, Peter still there making three hands." And on Saturday, 14 February, "The three boys came home from G. M. Wood."
  • On Monday, 15 February 1852, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent Peter, John and Saten back to G. M. Wood's to work."
  • On Sunday, 7 March 1852, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Peter, Saten and John returned from G. M. Wood's."
  • By deed dated 18 January 1853 in Walker County, Texas, William Nathan Lindley and his wife Martha J. Lindley of Walker County sold to Green Mark Wood of Walker County, for the sum of $2,000, two parcels of land (420.25 acres and 96.3 acres) in the John Sadler headright league in Walker County. Witnessed by F. B. Pankey and Robert Micajah Powell, recorded 27 January 1853, notary public Jonathan S. Collard.
         The 420.25 acre parcel was purchased from John Sadler by Samuel Washington Lindley and subsequently conveyed to his son William Lindley on 12 August 1848. The 96.2 acre parcel was purchased by William Lindley from John Sadler on 19 February 1849.
         Green Mark's purchase of this property involved a loan from F. B. Pankey, which specified that the larger parcel was "the land on which I reside," so apparently he was renting the property prior to the purchase. (Further research required.)
  • By deed dated 24 January 1853 in Walker County, Texas, Green Mark Wood and his wife Mary Jane LeGrand Wood sold to William Phillips Fisher of Lowndes County, Alabama, 1,000 acres of property in the Andrew Briscoe survey in Walker County, for the sum of $5,000, one-half in cash and a note for one-half due 1 January 1854. Recorded 21 February 1853, notary public Jonathan S. Collard.
  • A quarter of a league of land situated on the waters of the San Jacinto in Montgomery County, originally granted to Thomas Corner as a colonist of Austin’s Colony, sold at public auction at the Court House door in the Town of Montgomery by court-appointed Commissioners on 7 November 1854, for the sum of $5,512, was purchased by Green M. Wood as the special authorized agent and attorney in fact of George Goldthwaite of Montgomery County, Alabama, containing 1,111 acres more or less (save 111 acres of Zarelda and Miles Elkins). Said land was in error conveyed by deed to Green M. Wood in place of the said George Goldthwaite, and subsequently was conveyed to Judge Goldthwaite on 25 January 1855.
  • By deed dated 30 December 1854 in Walker County, Texas, William Nathan Lindley and his wife Martha J. Lindley of Walker County sold to Green Mark Wood for the sum of $50, 4.7 acres in the John Sadler headright league in Walker County. Witnessed by Henry Sandel, J. M. Naul and Oliver Powell, recorded 7 August 1855.
  • On Monday, 5 March 1855, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent John and Sam to Green's to split rails, Charles to drop corn."
  • On Saturday, 20 December 1856, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Girl Sarah got married to G. M. Wood's Boy Daniel."
  • On Friday, 18 December 1857, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent five hands to repair the bridge near G. M. Wood's."
  • On Wednesday, 13 January 1858, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent six hands to G. M. Wood to help him gather corn and had a terrible muck water rising in the waggon ruts."
  • On Wednesday, 7 July 1858, Wm Barnes Wood, in Green Wood's absence, recorded: "G.M. Wood
    returned home today without Campbell," and on Friday, the 9th, "Sent Lawrence to Huntsville after Campbell Wood." Then on Saturday, the 10th, "Campbell Wood got home from Rutersville."
  • On a blank page preceding the week of 6 February 1859, Green Wood recorded: "[Sunday] February 6th 1859, G. M. Wood and Wm B. Wood left this morning for Galveston. Returned 11th, Fryday."
  • On Thursday, 7 April 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent two Waggons to hawl Lumber for G.M.W."
  • On Thursday, 12 May 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent the hoe hands to G.M.W.s."
  • On Monday, 23 May 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent all my small hands to G.M.W. to thin corn."
  • On Thursday, 2 June 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent G.M.W. four hands to help raise a new room."
  • On Wednesday, 11 September 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Green & Willis and their wives went to the Thicket this morning."
  • On Wednesday, 23 November 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent all but some "timber giters" to G. M. W. to pick cotton."
  • On Saturday, 26 November 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Commenced Gining for G. M. Wood," and on the following Thursday, "packed 11 Bales cotton for G.M.W."
  • On Saturday, 10 December 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mule waggon hawling cotton from G.M.W. to Gin," and on Tuesday, the 13th, "Packed ten Bales cotton for G. M. Wood, making 21 Bales."
  • On Tuesday, 13 December 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Packed ten Bales cotton for G. M. Wood, making 21 Bales."
  • On Saturday, 7 January 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent twelve hands to G. M. Wood to work on his road."
  • Green Mark Wood and Mary Jane LeGrand appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1860 in Danville PO, Walker County, Texas. Other members of the household included Rush Brevard Wood, Solomon William Wood, Robert Cummings Wood, Martha Frances P. Wood, Milton LeGrand Wood and George Scovell Wood.
  • He was a farmer, according to the 1860 census.
  • Green Mark Wood appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1860 Green Mark Wood is listed in the 1860 Slave Schedule with 14 slaves (4 of whom were age 10 and younger, and none over age 60) and 3 slave houses, for an average of 4-5 persons per cabin.
  • On Wednesday, 29 August 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Packed five Bales of cotton for Green M. Wood."
  • On Monday, 26 November 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Rain. . . washed up the bridges on G. M. Wood's road and the Quarter bridge," and on the 29th, "Four hands hewing bridge timbers at G. M. Wood's." And worked on the road and bridge until 4 December.
  • On Saturday, 20 December 1862, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Started 4 hands, Tom, Charles, Laurens & Ephraim to work on public defences. G. M. Wood was Overseer. In all sent from this neighbornood 15 hands." And on Wednesday, the 24th, "Ben returned from carrying baggage to Houston for the hands sent to work on defences."
  • He enlisted on 27 December 1862 as a private for three months in Company B (Capt. T. J. Josey), 17th Brigade, Texas State Troops (Militia). He appeared on a muster roll dated 2 February 1863, in service over a month at Camp Lubbock and Camp Anderson, detailed to oversee hands at Galveston.
  • On Sunday, 18 January 1863, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sent off 5 hands to Houston on the second call Genl Magruder - John, Hamp, Ben, Sandy, Wesley & four on the first call making 9 good hands."
  • On Sunday, 1 February 1863, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "The negros I sent to work on call of Genl Magruder returned last evening except John & Tom, John Sick at Mr Berreys 12 miles from Houston, Greens Buyo."
  • He enlisted on 28 August 1863 at Montgomery as a private for six months in Company C (Capt. J. M. Montgomery), 17th Brigade, Texas State Troops (Militia). He appeared on a muster roll dated 28 August 1863 stationed at Camp San Jacinto.
  • On 7 October 1864, Mary Jane LeGrand wrote to Rush Brevard Wood:
         Danville, Texas
    My Darling Son:
         I have been feeling quite uneasy about you. We heard you were sick from eating fruit. Do my dear child take care of yourself and you must feel no hesitancy in going to Mr. Spyker's if you should get sick or wounded. Your Pa has written to Mr. Spyker concerning you. They are most excellent people. You will feel perfectly at home there, and no doubt he would take pleasure in having the son of his old friend with him. Should you get back to Louisiana, Mr. Cummings Post Office is Collinsburg.
         Well my child, I have your clothes all ready, I believe all you sent for. I put your gloves both pair in your coat pockets. Mrs. Preston Spiller knit the woolen gloves for you. Your Pa bought the other pair.
         Rush, I did not make the coat as you directed. I intended making a short one too, but did not have time. I have had three attacks of chills and fever since Felix came home. That is why I did not have time for making the other coat. Am just up now from the last attack. I hope what I send will please you. The coat is a very good one. The outside is not as stout as I would have liked. That part of it your Grandma gave you. I made everything myself except the knitting. The socks, Mrs. Wynne knit one pair, and your sister one pair. I will tell you right here, Mrs. Wynne and her family all send much love to you. Miss Ella is looking very pretty. I tried to get her to knit you a pair of socks. She was too much afraid of being teased.
          Miss Sarah has made Jack and yourself each a hat and your Grandma sends each of you a pair of over socks for which you must thank them when you write.
         You liked to have been too late for blankets, just did have time to weave in some on the negro cloth. They are not as heavy as I would wish. It is the best I could do for the time. I intend to weave some as soon as I can and keep some on hand. Your Pa went to get you some tobacco. Mr. Pankey’s Ned has the best of any one else. He asked $2.00 in specie. Your Pa did not get any, of course he said that was entirely too much for his pile. He has gone to get some from your Grandpa’s negroes. Daniel has twisted up some to send you. Your Pa says it is not good. I will mark it so you can tell it.
         Your Pa and I have concluded to send you specie. The confederate money is so worthless. He has made arrangements with Mr. George to get $15.00. The way Mr. George rates it is $6.00. The way it is rated in Houston is $9.00. I hope that will answer your purpose. You must take good care of it.
         Rush, when you write, tell me who all your officers are, from Brigadier Gen. down. I am so glad to see you are writing often. Do continue to do so. I am always so anxious to hear. Give my love to Jack. Tell him if he should get sick he must call on Mr. Spyker. I forgot to mention it when I was speaking of it.
         Your Pa could not get the leather for but one pair of boots. He got the leather from Mr. Wynne. You will find some adhesive plaster. It will be good to put on a cut place. I send you the soap, tho it is not so good. Also a cake of suet and a bundle of rags.
         Rush, let me caution you about using too much tobacco. I hear it is making so many people sick. It made Eason have spasms. He has quit it entirely.
         From your letter to Eliza, I see you are tired of the service. I know it must be very trying to one as young as yourself particularly. I expect it goes as hard with me as it does with you, for I assure you I think of you often, often. You must cheer up and keep in good spirits. You have it to do and must make the best of it. One thing I am proud of in you, you do not aspire to office, or fame. You are fighting for your country’s sake alone. I heard you say that when you was at home last. So many are expecting an early peace. God grant that it may come. The children all join in love to brother Rush. I expect Fanny will want to write. Good bye. May the blessings of God rest upon you now and forever is the prayer of your loving Mother.
         [Signed] M. J. Wood.
  • On 3 December 1864, Green Mark Wood wrote to Rush Brevard Wood:
         Danville, Texas
    My Dear Son:
         I returned home day before yesterday after an absence of three weeks in the Reserve Corps. All were well when I arrived. Campbell was taken sick yesterday and your mother has chills every two or three weeks. The school is out and Solomon will be home today.
         We caught a good many deserters and conscripts in the Big Thicket. We get very little news now. We have not heard a word from you since Jack Williamson's letter just after the arrival of Capt. Raney Fisher. Old Lincoln is elected and the war will probably go on for years to come. So you may make up your mind to remain in the service for years to come. I regret it on account of my children. I shall not be able to give them an education. And I fear should it end you will not feel like going to school.
         I am looking for Mr. Cummings out here. He and his mother-in-law and brother-in-law are going to move out with all their negroes some 700 [sic] to get out of the way of the Yankees.
         I am expecting to send this by Mr. Nathan Burke. I am very hopeful about the final result of the war but very many are desponding.
         Your Uncle Campbell was well when we heard from him last. He had not been assigned to duty as yet. The Yankees captured his horse crossing the Mississippi, and he has not been able to get another. I hope you take good care of your horse. No news worth mentioning. Your mother and all the children send to you and Jack Williamson much love. We were disappointed in not getting a letter by the wagon when it returned. I can think of no more to write.
         Your father, Green M. Wood.
  • The following appeared on 17 March 1868 in Flake's Bulletin: Appeals from Registration Decisions. Headquarters Fifth Military District, New Orleans, La., March 13, 1868. Special Orders No. 57. [Extract.] I. The following appeals from decisions made by boards of registrars of the last revised registry in the State of Texas, having been forwarded to these headquarters, are hereby decided and announced as follows: . . . 5. J. D. Cunningham, Walker county, rejected because he was a county commissioner, an office under a general law of the State, and as such applicant would not be entitled to registry if he had afterward engaged in rebellion, etc. But in the absence of proof of the fact he would be entitled to register. The report of the board of registrars stated that "he was rejected by a former board for the reason that he was a county commissioner, and present board rejects him without examination." This decision was wrong. The applicant is entitled to registry if it is shown that he did not "afterward engage in insurrection," etc. 6. John J. Davis, Richard Bass, John Hill, Samuel L. Kelsey, Green H. Wood [sic], all of Walker county, rejected by the board. These cases are similar in principle to the case of J. D. Cunningham, above cited, and the same action will be taken therein. . . .
  • The following appeared on 14 December 1868 in The Daily Austin Republican: Notice to Creditors that Bankrupt has applied for final discharge. In the District Court of the United States for the Western District of Texas. In the matter of Green M. Wood vs. Creditors, Bankrupt. In Bankruptcy. United States District Court, Clerk's office, at Austin, on the 11th day of December, A.D., 1868. Please to take notice hereby, that a petition has been, to wit, on the 28th day of November, A.D., 1868, filed in said District Court, by G. M. Wood, of Walker county, in said district, who has been heretofore duly declared bankrupt, under the Act of Congress entitled "An act to establish a uniform system of bankruptcy throughout the United States," approved March 2, 1867, for a discharge and certificate thereof, from all his debts and other claims proveable under said act, and that the 8th day of Jan'y A.D., 1869, at 12 o'clock M, at Austin before W. D. Price, Register in Bankruptcy, the time and place assigned for the hearing of the same; when and where you may attend, and show cause, if any you have, why the prayer of said petition should not be granted. M. Hopkins, Clerk of the U. S. District Court, For said District.
  • Green Mark Wood and Mary Jane LeGrand appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1870 in Huntsville, Walker County, Texas. Other members of the household included Rush Brevard Wood, Solomon William Wood, Robert Cummings Wood, Martha Frances P. Wood, Milton LeGrand Wood, George Scovell Wood, Campbell Clark Wood and Green Alexander Wood.
  • He was a farmer, according to the 1870 census.
  • The following appeared on 16 July 1876 in The Galveston Daily News: (New Waverly, July 13) Eds. News--I have just returned form a general trip through Polk, San Jacinto and Walker Counties, and I am glad to report the finest crops of corn that have been made in this section for many years. The cotton looks fine, and the planters are generally up with their work.
         . . . Next Saturday the Grangers of this place have an exhibition of water melons, and everybody is invited to attend a general water melon eating. Mr. Jas. A. Hill, a planter a few miles from this place, is the brag planter of the county, and no doubt will make a big display of melons and grapes. Last year he had any quantity of peaches, melons and grapes. I am sorry to say his peach crop this year is nothing. Green M. Wood is another water melon man, and he will come in on the homne stretch among the head. Our Justice, H. W. Fisher, is the king of the strawberry business in this county. He has made between $300 and $400 off his little patch this season. He can sell all he can raise at $1 a gallon at home, and he says cotton is not king--that strawberries is the joker. . . .
  • Green Mark Wood appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1880 in Walker County, Texas. Other members of the household included Mary Jane LeGrand, Campbell Clark Wood and Green Alexander Wood.
  • He was a farmer, according to the 1880 census.
  • He and Thomas Jefferson Haynie was mentioned in the obituary of Campbell Clark Wood that appeared on 7 March 1885 in the Galveston Daily News: (Navasota) Campbell C. Wood died on the Jeff Hainey place, March 5, and was buried in the cemetery here to-day. He was the son of Colonel Green M. Wood, and aged 26 years -- a quiet, gentlemanly young man, whose death is very much regretted.
  • The following appeared on 16 April 1896 in The Dallas Morning News: (Navasota, April 14) On April 9 Mr. and Mrs. Green M. Wood celebrated their golden wedding at the residence of their daughter, Mrs. L. J. Goree, Revs. Duncan and J. M. Wesson officiating. At the ceremony were five children, thirty-eight grandchildren and two great grandchildren, besides a hundred or more friends. Everybody seemed to enjoy themselves as much as if the venerable couple had just fallen in love with one another instead of having lived together for a half century, and congratulations by word of mouth and telegraph "were as plentiful as leaves in Vallambrosa in autumn." After everybody had wished everybody else everything good an elegant repast was discussed and the party dispersed.
         Green M. Wood, the groom, was born in Georgia in 1814, and lived near the city of Montgomery and married Miss M. J. LeGrand of Tuskegee. In 1849 they settled in Walker county, where they resided till their taking up their residence in this city. They reared a family of seven sons and a daughter, the latter Mrs. L. J. Goree, whom they make their home with. Mr. Wood was a private in the confederate army.
         Mrs. G. M. Wood was a daughter of W. C. LeGrand and was born near Wadesborough, N. C., and removed to Tuskegee at a very early age.
  • With all their children in town for Green Mark and Mary Jane's 50th wedding anniversary celebration in April 1896, it is likely that this was the occasion for the photograph of their five surviving sons, treasured more than a hundred years later by all of their descendants.
    Sons of Green Mark Wood and Mary Jane LeGrand, about 1896
  • Green Mark Wood died on 5 March 1898 at age 83 in Navasota, Grimes County, Texas.
  • His wife Mary Jane LeGrand became a widow at his death.
  • He was buried at Oakland Cemetery in Navasota, Grimes County, Texas.
  • A single grave marker identifies the graves of Green Mark Wood and Mary Jane LeGrand.
    Green Mark and Mary Jane LeGrand Wood, Oakland Cemetery, Navasota
  • Last Edited: 21 Jan 2016

Family: Mary Jane LeGrand b. 23 January 1830, d. 19 March 1900