Clark Calhoun Campbell

b. December 1824, d. 27 July 1907

Clark Calhoun Campbell, 1824-1907
  • Clark Calhoun Campbell was born in December 1824 in Columbus, Muscogee County, Georgia.
  • John Wesley Campbell and Ann Williamson Clark appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1840 in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama. Other (counted but unnamed) members of the household apparently included Clark Calhoun Campbell, Susan Mary Campbell, Samuel D. Campbell, Ann Clark Campbell, John Wesley Campbell and Marcus L. Campbell. This family matches except (1) "Eddie" is not included (may not have been born until after census), and (2) there is one extra male aged 20-29.
  • He married Lucy Caroline Goree, daughter of James Lyles Goree and Martha Rabb, on 3 August 1847 in Perry County, Alabama.
  • Clark Calhoun Campbell and Lucy Caroline Goree appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1850 in DeSoto Parish, Louisiana, enumerated next to Clark's mother and siblings.. Other members of the household included J. Goree Campbell and John Wesley Campbell.
  • He was a physician, according to the 1850 census.
  • On Tuesday, 2 October 1855, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Doctor and J. Campbell and Mr. Goree came this evening," and on Monday, the 8th, "Doctor & J. Campbell and Mr. Goree left for home."
         Likely Mr. Goree was Samuel Eskridge Goree, living in Walker County, whose younger brother Robert Daniel will marry Ann Campbell's daughter Fannie, and younger brother Langston James will marry Green Mark's daughter Fannie.
  • Green Wood recorded in his book of Misc. Financial & Slave Records, the account of Doctor Clark Campbell for a period beginning 24 October 1857, for lard, butter, potatoes, &c., settled on 28 June 1858.
  • On a page of orchard notes in Book 10, Green Wood recorded: "Planted 46 young Apple trees, present from Doctor C. Campbell, part of Lot bought of a nursery man."
  • Green Wood recorded in his book of Misc. Financial & Slave Records, the account of Doctor Clark Campbell for the period June through December 1859 (ham and two cows and calves), settled by cash on 14 April 1860.
  • Clark Calhoun Campbell and Lucy Caroline Goree appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1860 in Montgomery County, Texas. Other members of the household included J. Goree Campbell, John Wesley Campbell, Martha Campbell, Clark Calhoun Campbell Jr., Annie Campbell and Robert L. Wood. C. Campbell is listed in the 1860 Slave Schedule with 27 slaves (10 of whom were age 10 and younger) and 4 slave houses.
  • He was a farmer, according to the 1860 census.
  • On Tuesday, 13 August 1861, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Started my Waggon (Ben driving) Doctor Campbell and Judge Goldthwaite Waggons to Nibletts Bluff Sabine river to meet Captain R. M. Powell & company & take them to Berwicks Bay."
  • The following appeared on 13 May 1862 in the Galveston Weekly News:
         Donations received at the C. S. Hospital, Galveston, for the month of April: From the "Ladies Aid Society," of Danville, Montgomery county, through Dr. Campbell -- butter, eggs, chickens, candles, and socks. . . .
  • On Tuesday, 19 August 1862, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Spent the day at Doctor Campbell's. Hard rain there."
  • C. Campbell, Assistant Surgeon, 4th Infantry Regiment, Texas State Troops, appears on a statement dated 5 December1863, Houston, and for the month of November 1863 was serving in the field.
  • "Account of Cotton Sold to P. J. Willis for the Confederate Government, sent off by Doctor C. Campbell's Wagons, 24 bales.", Green Wood recorded: During July 1864.
  • The following appeared on 19 May 1870 in The Houston Daily Union: Bankrupt.
    Notice--In Bankruptcy.
    Clark C. Campbell vs. His Creditors.
         In the District Court of the United States for the Eastern District of Texas.
         This is to give notice that on the 12th day of May A. D. 1870, a Warrant in Bankruptcy was issued against the estate of Clark C. Campbell, in the county of Galveston, and the State of Texas, who has been adjudged a bankrupt on his own petition.
         That the payment of any debts and the delivery of any property belonging to said bankrupt, to him or for his use, and the transfer of any property by such bankrupt, is forbidden by law. That a meeting of the creditors of said bankrupt to prove their debts and to choose one or more assignees of his estate, will be held at a Court of Bankruptcy to be holden before Jesse Stances, Register in Bankruptcy, at his office in the city of Galveston, on the 25th day of May, A. D. 1870, at 10 o'clock A. M.
         Wm. E. Parker, U. S. Marshal. Eastern District of Texas.
  • Clark Calhoun Campbell appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1870 in Galveston, Texas, at Sisters of Charity Hospital & School as a physician. He also is enumerated with his family in Galveston.
  • Clark Calhoun Campbell and Lucy Caroline Goree appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1870 in Galveston County, Texas, enumerated next to Clark's sister Eddie Williams. Clark also is enumerated at the Sisters of Charity Hospital. The family's out-of-town residence on Clear Creek in Galveston County was called "Rest Haven," according to daughter Lucie Campbell Lee.. Other members of the household included J. Goree Campbell, John Wesley Campbell, Martha Campbell, Clark Calhoun Campbell Jr., Annie Campbell and Lucie Frances Campbell.
  • The following appeared on 2 June 1870 in The Houston Daily Union: Bankrupt.
    Notice--In Bankruptcy.
         In the matter of Clark C. Campbell, Bankrupt--No. 372.
         The undersigned hereby gives notice of his appointment as assignee of the estate of Clark C. Campbell, of Galveston county, State of Texas, who has been adjudged a Bankrupt upon his own petition by the District Court of the United States, for the Eastern District of Texas, at Galveston, May 27th, A. D. 1870.
         L. F. Harris, Assignee.
  • The following appeared on 15 September 1870 in The Houston Daily Union: Bankrupt.
    Notice--In Bankruptcy.
         In the District Court of the United States for the Eastern District of Texas, at Galveston, in the matter of Clark C. Campbell, Bankrupt. In Bankruptcy.
         This is to give notice that on the 10th day of Sept., A. D., 1870, a petition was filed by said bankrupt, praying for a discharge from all his debts provable under the Bankrupt Act, and that an order was made thereon by said Court, requiring the same to be heard on the 24th of September, A. D., 1870, at 10 o'clock, A. M., at the United States Court rooms in the city of Galveston.
         Wherefore all creditors who have proved their debts against the estate of said bankrupt, and all other persons in interest are hereby notified to appear at said time and place, and show cause, if any they should have, why the prayer of said petition should not be granted.
  • The following appeared on 21 November 1874 in The Galveston Daily News: [Married] At the residence of the bride's parents, in Galveston county, Tuesday evening, November 17, 1874, Powhatan S. Wren, Esq., and Mattie, eldest daughter of Dr. Clark Campbell. No cards.
  • He was for many years Galveston city health officer and chief surgeon of the city hospital, as recorded frequently in the Galveston Daily News.
  • The following appeared on 12 September 1878 in the Galveston Daily News: There is no body of men in this state now in the exercise of more important or delicate functions than the Galveston board of health. Its members stand sentry not only for the health of their own city, the largest in the state, but for the health of the state itself, any part of which might be the victim to their neglect. . . . Dr. Haden. . . . Dr. T. J. Heard. . . . Dr. Watts. . . . N. N. John. . . . Mr. Robira. . . . Mr. Masterson. . . . Capt. Fisher, Mr. Lauve. . . . Col. A. W. Spaight completes the number. He is one of the commissioners from Texas to the Paris exposition and is absent from the city. A retired lawyer of independent means, he is a bright example of a southern gentleman, who, on the Galveston board of health, or wherever found, would act as a man of lofty honor and of tried intelligence and capacity. The secretary of the board is Dr. Clark Campbell, who brought to the position the knowledge and practical facility acquired in a long professional experience in many years of faithful service in connection with the public hospital of Galveston; and of its quarantine physician, Dr. M. R. Brown, it is enough to say that he has developed qualities of vigilence, activity and unrelenting firmness and singleness of purpose above all things necessary in an officer charged with his mementous trust. . . .
  • Clark Calhoun Campbell and Lucy Caroline Goree appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1880 in Galveston, Texas, at 5 East Broadway. Other members of the household included Clark Calhoun Campbell Jr., Lucie Frances Campbell, Powhatan Sampson Wren, Martha Campbell, Clark Campbell Wren, Powhatan Sampson Wren Jr., Mary Caroline Campbell and Ann W. Campbell. Boarders (nieces) Mary and Nannie Campbell are the sisters of Sam Campbell, found nearby in the household of Clark's brother Archibald, all children of Clark's brother Marcus.
  • He was a doctor, according to the 1880 census.
  • The following appeared on 6 February 1881 in the Galveston Daily News: Mortuary Report. Dr. Clark Campbell, health physician, reports the following list of deaths for the week ending February 4: . . . Flora McQueen Campbell, 7 years 8 months, inflammation of brain. . .
  • Charles Kleber Lee and Lucie Frances Campbell appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1900 in Galveston, Texas, at 1905 37th Street. Other members of the household included Clark Calhoun Campbell, Lucy Caroline Goree and Clark Calhoun Campbell III. Also in the household one female servant. It appears that nephew Clark C. Campbell was enumerated in two different households in this census.
  • Clark Calhoun Campbell became a widower at the 18 January 1907 death of his wife Lucy Caroline Goree.
  • The following appeared on 24 July 1907 in the Galveston Daily News: News was received here yesterday that Dr. Clark Campbell, formerly of this city, but now residing with his daughter, Mrs. Kleber Lee of Fort Worth, had fallen and broken his hip. Dr. Campbell is the father of Mrs. M. C. Wren of this city and the accident, because of Dr. Campbell's advanced age, is considered quite serious.
  • Clark Calhoun Campbell died on 27 July 1907 at age 82 in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas, at 702 West Third Street.
  • The following appeared on 27 July 1907 in The Fort Worth Telegram: Clarke C. Campbell, aged 83 years, died at 3:30 o'clock Saturday morning at the family residence at 702 West Third street. The deceased, who was formerly a resident of Galveston, had been a resident of Fort Worth for the past eighteen months, and leaves the following children: G. C. Campbell of Austin, Mrs. M. C. Wrenn of Galveston; J. W. Campbell of Fort Worth, and Mrs. C. K. Lee of Fort Worth. The remains were shipped Saturday afternoon to Galveston by the L. P. Robertson undertaking firm, where interment will be had Sunday afternoon.
  • He was buried at Trinity Episcopal Cemetery in Galveston, Texas, with the year 1908 appearing on the grave marker.
  • A single grave marker identifies the graves of Clark Calhoun Campbell and Lucy Caroline Goree and J. Goree Campbell and Martha Wren.
  • Research Note: In Family Mosaic, Eddie Sue Goree, niece of John and Douglas Campbell paints a sorry picture of her uncles, but it is important to note that her knowledge and/or memory of her Campbell family was quite imperfect. For example, while there is hard evidence that Ann Campbell and sons Clark (and family), John, and Douglas settled in Montgomery County after leaving Louisiana in the mid-1850s, she states that "they settled at Clear Creek, near Galveston, and called their plantation 'Killiecrankie' after a place in Scotland."
  • =====================
    Clark Calhoun Campbell was born in 1824 in Georgia, the son of John Wesley Campbell and Ann Williamson Clark. He moved with his family to Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, before 1840. He was married to Lucy C. Goree on 3 August 1847 in Perry County, Alabama. She was the daughter of James Lyles Goree and Martha Rabb. In 1850, the couple was enumerated in De Soto Parish, Louisiana, and his occupation was given as physician. His father died in Louisiana, and his family and widowed mother migrated to Montgomery County, Texas, in about 1856. By 1858, he owned 420 acres in the Joseph Lindley headright, 24 slaves, and twelve horses. In 1860, a resident of the town of Danville, C. Campbell's occupation was entered as farmer, and he had a total wealth of $22,000. Presumably having lost their wealth in the aftermath of the Civil War, Clark and Lucy Campbell moved their family to Galveston before 1870. There, Clark was affiliated with the Sisters of Charity Hospital as a physician. He was appointed to the Galveston Board of Health, and in 1878 was reported by the Galveston Daily News to be the secretary of the board, a man "who brought to the position the knowledge and practical facility acquired in a long professional experience in many years of faithful service. . . ." Lucy died on 18 January 1907, and Dr. Campbell died on 27 July 1907, at the age of 82, at the home of his daughter in Tarrant County.
         Biographical sketch prepared by Karen McCann Hett as part of "Danville Doctors" for a future edition of the MCG&HS History of Montgomery County, Texas.
  • Last Edited: 18 Jun 2016

Family: Lucy Caroline Goree b. November 1827, d. 18 January 1907