Ella Abercrombie Wood

b. 31 January 1852, d. 25 February 1925

Ella Abercrombie Wood Campbell, 1852-1925
  • About 1837, portraits were painted of Green and Evelina Wood by an unknown artist (estimated date based on their apparent ages in the portraits). If a third portrait, of a young girl, was painted by the same artist, at the same time, it would have been of daughter Lizzie Green, as her descendants believe. The painting is today, however, in the family collection of descendants of youngest daughter Ella, so identity of the original of that portrait is uncertain.
  • Ella Abercrombie Wood was born on 31 January 1852 in Montgomery County, Texas, at Greenwood plantation.
  • Green Wood wrote to Bolling Hall Jr. on 18 June 1852, ". . . That young Daughter of ours grows finely & I think is about as nigh perfect in beauty as it is possible to be, regret that you can't all see her, it is worth a trip across the Gulf. . . ."  
  • On Thursday, 8 July 1852, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs Wood & Ella, Mr Powell & Wm B. Wood all left for Huntsville at 5 oclock this morning," and on the following day, "Mrs Wood & all the rest returned from Huntsville."
  • On Tuesday, 14 October 1856, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs. Wood, Mr. Powell, and Ella and Wood started on a visit to Mr. Fisher, C. Abercrombie's, and Mr. McGar and Colonel Yoakum."
  • On Thursday, 17 June 1858, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs Wood, Mr Powell with Ella & Wood left for Sour Lake this morning."
  • On Wednesday, 21 July 1858, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs W. & Mr Powell & children got home from the Sour Lake. All well."
  • On Thursday, 18 August 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs. Wood, Ella, Mr. Powell and Campbell left for Kellum Springs in company of Mrs. Scott and Miss Ella Scott," and on Saturday, the 27th, "Mrs. Wood and all others got home from Kellum Springs."
  • On Sunday, 9 October 1859, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs. Wood and Mr. Powell and Ella returned today from a visit to friends on the Brazos and on the way got from the traps three fine Buffalo fish; one weighed twelve pounds."
  • Green Wood and Evelina Alexander Barnes appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1860 in Montgomery County, Texas, next to their son William Barnes Wood.. Other members of the household included Ella Abercrombie Wood, Campbell Wood, Sarah Anne Harris, Eliza Stocks Wood, Charles Harris Wood, Willis Eason Wood, Elizabeth Ames Wood and Powell Wood. Green Wood is listed in the 1860 Slave Schedule with 106 slaves (33 of whom were age 10 and younger, and 8 of whom were age 60 and older) and 23 slave houses, for an average of 4-5 persons per cabin.
  • On Wednesday, 27 June 1860, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs. Wood, Mr. Powell, Ella and Wood Powell and Wm B. W. and wife and daughter all left for Sour Lake." And on Monday, 1 July, "Bob returned from Sour Lake with the Waggon and six mules, left all well." On Monday, 9 July, "Started Bob with waggon and six mules to Sour Lake to bring the Bagage." And on Sunday, 15 July, "Mrs. Wood, Mr. Powell and the rest returned from Sour Lake. Mr. A. W. Speight and Lady came also.
  • Captain "Mike" Powell wrote to his young sister-in-law Ella Wood on 6 April 1862, from Camp Wigfall, near Fredericksburg, Virginia. He ended the four-page letter, "We are all enjoying fine health now & are very anxious to see Lt. Hill return with our recruits. Your bro' Campbell is getting very fat, Bose not so fat as he used to be, & Pete Williamson looks like a Dutchman that drank a gallon of Lager beer every day. We all want to go home very much but not until the war is over. If I never come home you must tell Wood that you are to take care of him & that he must love you & wait on you as long as he lives, & when war comes he must fight for his country & not stay at home. Give my love to your father and mother & all the family, Your Bro' Mike."
  • On Monday, 8 September 1862, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Mrs E. A. Wood & the Girls started on a visit to Mr McGar,s."
  • On 26 May 1867, Evelina Wood wrote to Ella Abercrombie Wood: My Dear Aunt, I expect you think I have treated you badly but I have been waiting to get a letter from you which don't come. so I will make an attempt to write. Miss Martha & Mama spent yesterday with Grandma & we hade such a nice vegetable dinner. Tockey played on the Guitar for us she says it is quite hard for her to learn. Grandma is looking quite thin, but seems to be well. she sells butter every week. I am going to school to Miss Martha & I hope that she will give vacation before you & Cousin come home. I am studying Geography Grammar Arithmetic & Reading. I am trying to improve as fast as I can. Aunt Bessies nurse has the itch which makes her very uneasy for fear Frank will have it. they now have Lucretia nursing for them. I see but little of Frank. Dr. Campbell left yesterday for Ala. I think he has gone for his Sister Mrs. Farris. How much I would like to attend your examination. I am very glad we do not have any. Cousin Bose came this morning for vegetables & flowers - he stays? very closely at his store? Capt [Lorenzo or Horatio?] Fisher is going to Mexico next July to look at the country - they are all thinking of moveing. This is the day for Mr Richardson to preach but the weather is so bad he will not have many out to hear him. Mrs Campbell is going to have her little daughter Lucy baptized - she will not have it done in church but at home. Ma and Pa Join me in love for Cousin and yourself. I shall expect an answer soon. Your loving Niece, Lina Wood
         Minimal punctuation added by the transcriber to enhance readability.
  • On 25 May 1868 in Montgomery County, Texas, Letters of Guardianship were granted to Evelina A. Wood.
  • In a letter dated 15 February 1869 to Ella Abercrombie Wood in Danville, Alexander Gregg wrote from San Antonio, Texas.
  • The following appeared on 31 May 1869 in The Galveston Tri-Weekly News: The Twentieth Annual Convention of the Protestant Episcopal Church, in the Diocese of Texas, met on Thursday last, 27th instant, at 10:30 A. M., at Trinity Church, according to appointment.
         The Convention was opened by divine service, a sermon, and the administration of the Holy Communion, the Right Rev. Alex. Gregg, D.D., officiating, assisted by Revs. Richardson, Tays and Rogers. . . .
         A quorum being present the Convention proceeded to elect a secretary. The ballot was dispensed with, Rev. Mr. Richardson was nominated and unanimously elected. . . .
         Minutes of the third day's proceedings read and approved.
         The Bishop made a few remarks expressive of his satisfaction at the spirit of unity which had characterized the Council, and the encouraging prospects of the Church, together with his heartfelt appreciation of the kindly and affectionate spirit manifested towards himself.
         There being no further business before the Council, on motion, after singing "Gloria in Excelsis," prayer by the Bishop, and the Apostolic Benediction, the Council adjourned sine die.
  • William Barnes Wood and Cornelia Josephine Mitchell appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1870 in Danville, Montgomery County, Texas. Other members of the household included Ella Abercrombie Wood, Evelina Wood, Evelina Alexander Barnes, Campbell Wood, Eliza Stocks Wood, Elizabeth Ames Wood and Powell Wood.
  • She married Douglas McQueen Campbell, son of John Wesley Campbell and Ann Williamson Clark, on 12 December 1872 in Montgomery County, Texas.
  • Douglas McQueen Campbell and Ella Abercrombie Wood appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1880 in Montgomery County, Texas. Other members of the household included Ann Williamson Clark, Sarah Patterson Campbell, Emeline L. Campbell, John William Campbell and Evelina Alexander Barnes. Emma was the daughter of Douglas' widowed brother John W., and Sarah and John W. were the children of their deceased brother Marcus.
  • Evelina Wood wrote (from Willis) to her grandson Wood Powell on 12 April 1887, ". . . I wish your three sweet daughters & Campbell's girls, Lina's & "Ella's little red head could see each other & become acquainted. I want Lina to send you one of "Willie's pictures recently taken. How I long to see you my dear boy and your sweet wife & children. I sometimes think Is life worth living? when kindred are so far away . . ."
         Letter in private collection of B. M. Henwood, descendant of Wm Wood Powell; original transcription by R. E. Reichardt.
  • Evelina Wood wrote from Willis, Texas, to her grandson Wood Powell in Christian County, Illinois on 12 April 1887, ". . . Ella is assisting Mrs. Woolridge in preparing for Maud's wedding (the only daughter) She marries on the 14, next Thursday night. A Mr. Watson who stands well in Willis. he is a dry goods clerk in T. W. Smith's store. Ella assisted in making ten large cakes yesterday & they are finishing them this morning. Ella’s afternoon will be devoted to icing & embossing them. she had several cakes baked here & will prepare some of the meats in her kitchen. Mrs. W. knows very little about such things. . . . Billie & Josie will be in to the wedding. Dr. W. lives across the street from us. I expect to witness the ceremony. . . ."
         Letter in private collection of B. M. Henwood, descendant of Wm Wood Powell; original transcription by R. E. Reichardt. Minimal punctuation added to enhance readability.
  • Douglas McQueen Campbell and Ella Abercrombie Wood appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1900 in Houston, Harris County, Texas, at 1104 San Jacinto Street. Other members of the household included Evelyn Lee Campbell.
  • In 1907, Ella Abercrombie Wood was living in Houston, Harris County, Texas, at the time her brother Campbell began his Memoir.
  • The following appeared on 25 July 1908 in the Galveston Daily News: Miss Julia Lee Wren is in Houston visiting her cousin, Miss Evelyn Campbell, daughter of Mrs. Douglas Campbell.
  • Douglas McQueen Campbell and Ella Abercrombie Wood appeared in the US federal census of 15 April 1910 in Houston, Harris County, Texas, at 1006 San Jacinto Street. Other members of the household included Evelyn Lee Campbell.
  • She was keeping a boarding house, accordig to the 1910 census.
  • On 24 July 1913, Robert Micajah Powell wrote to Ella Abercrombie Wood: 4440 Maryland ave, July 24th. Dear Ella, Your letter just arrived. My anxiety relieved. Oh !! These little mothers! They are the source & fount of new life & inspiration. They bring grand mothers in their KingDom. There is brightness & joy & all the new love centres on one little mite of humanity. Bess joins in love and congratulations. I read your letter inclosing the clipping, Campbells letter was so kind & sweet of him. It informed old friends & comrades that I am still living where I lived. Some of the old boys have seen it, written me nice letters. Had a card from Campbell this morning in your letter -- Florence is living happily in her Kentucky home, where the Stork is expected some months latter -- Bessie will go to her about the first of August. We have had a long dry hot spell -- But there has been rain, the temperature moderated. The heat distresst me, but I got through all right -- am in fairly good health -- Regret the hard times in Lina's life. Tell her there is too much for her to live for & she ought to have more regard for her health -- Trouble & sorrow seem to persecute Robert Hill & family -- poor Lizzie, not much sunshine in her life -- Captain Hill wrote me about Robert -- a sad letter -- Our Babies keep well. They are a noisy & an enterprizing gang -- I never see or hear from Woods children, they walk on the other side of the street to avoid me -- Glad Evelyn gave her daughter the Traditional name -- Congratulations to Papa Doc -- Love to all, Your Bro Mike.
         Minimal punctuation added by the transcriber to enhance readability.
  • Harwood D. Ponton and Evelyn Lee Campbell appeared in the US federal census of 1 January 1920 in Lake Charles, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. Other members of the household included Ella Abercrombie Wood, Ella Wood Ponton, Harwood Douglas Ponton and Douglas McQueen Campbell.
  • Ella Abercrombie Wood died on 25 February 1925 at age 73 in Lake Charles, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana.
  • Her husband Douglas McQueen Campbell became a widower at her death.
  • She was buried at Graceland / Orange Grove Cemetery in Lake Charles, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana.
  • Research Note: In Family Mosaic, Eddie Sue Goree, niece of John and Douglas Campbell paints a sorry picture of her uncles, but it is important to note that her knowledge and/or memory of her Campbell family was quite imperfect. For example, while there is hard evidence that Ann Campbell and sons Clark (and family), John, and Douglas settled in Montgomery County after leaving Louisiana in the mid-1850s, she states that "they settled at Clear Creek, near Galveston, and called their plantation 'Killiecrankie' after a place in Scotland."
  • Last Edited: 19 Apr 2016

Family: Douglas McQueen Campbell b. 24 January 1844, d. 20 October 1925