James Tillman Smith

b. 8 September 1843, d. 30 January 1908

James Tillman Smith, 1843-1908
  • James Tillman Smith was born on 8 September 1843 in Lilesville, Anson County, North Carolina.
  • He married Ellen Pegues, daughter of William Johnson Pegues and Eliza A. Watson.
  • James Tillman Smith became a widower at the 3 March 1870 death of his wife Ellen Pegues.
  • James Tillman Smith appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1870 in Navasota, Grimes County, Texas. Other members of the household included Ellen Pegues Smith. He is identified as Jane Smith, age 27.
  • He married Emma Adele DeMaret circa 1874.
  • James Tillman Smith and Emma Adele DeMaret appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1880 in Cleburne, Johnson County, Texas, at Anglin Street. Other members of the household included Ellen Pegues Smith. Also in the household were children Ida Mary (age 4) and William (11 months), and one female servant.
  • He was a lawyer, according to the 1880 census.
  • James Tillman Smith and Emma Adele DeMaret appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1900 in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas, at 208 Taylor Street. Other members of the household included Ellen Pegues Smith. Also in the household were children William C. (age 20), DeMaret (18), Selwyn (17) and Felix (12.)
  • He was a lawyer, according to the 1900 census.
  • James Tillman Smith died on 30 January 1908 at age 64 in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas, at 802 Taylor Street.
  • His wife Emma Adele DeMaret became a widow at his death.
  • He was buried at Cleburne Memorial Cemetery in Johnson County, Texas.
  • The following appeared on 31 January 1908 in the Fort Worth Star-Telegram: The funeral of Judgte Tillman Smith, whose death occurred Thursday night, following a stroke of paralysis Sunday, was held Friday afternoon from the family residence, 208 Taylor street, attended by a large number of friends from Fort Worth and other parts of the state.
         Many handsome floral peices were taken with the remains to Cleburne, where interment will be made Saturday from the home of his sister, Mrs. Willingham.
         Judge Smith had been ill since last August, but his condition was not considered serious until Sunday, when he suffered the stroke from which he did not rally, remaining only partly conscious until his death.
         The pallbearers were C. K. Lee, Judge M. E. Smith, Judge T. W. Simmons, Judge Irby Dunklin, W. T. McLean Jr., W. J. Berne, Thomas P. West and George E. White.
         Judge Smith was widely known thru the state, having been a member of the legislature as well as a prominent of the Fort Worth and Cleburne bars. He was an active member of R. E. Lee Camp, United Confederate Veterans, a Mason and a member of the Knights of Honor.
         Judge Smith was born in Lilesville, Anson County, North Carolina, Sept. 8, 1844. [sic] and was educated as a boy at the University of North Carolina. He left college to shoulder a musket in the civil war, and after the trouble was over caught the prevalent "Texas fever," and emigrated to the Lone Star state, first locating in Grimes county.
         Shortly afterward he entered the law office of John D. McAdoo in Washington county, and was licensed to practice law at Brenham in April, 1866, removing soon afterward to Hillsboro.
         While making his home in Hillsboro he paid a short visit to his old home in North Carolina, and upon his return again removed his headquarters to Navasota, where he was actively engaged in his professional duties and but [sic] up a large and lucrative practice.
         It was while a resident of Grimes county that Judge Smith was elected to the Texas legislature of 1874-5. He was elected state senator in 1876 for the Fifteenth district as a democrat, his district comprising the counties of Grimes, Madison, Walker and Trinity. While state senator Judge Smith formed a law partnership with Hon. A. W. DeBerry, then secretary of state, with offices at Cleburne.
         Judge Smith resigned from the legislature to take up the practice of law at Cleburne. In 1891 he moved to Fort Worth because of the broader field offered his energies and ambition, and from that time became an honored member of the Fort Worth bar. His first practice in this city was with the firm of Field, West and Smith, and at the time of his death was associated with his eldest son, William C. Smith.
         His wife was Miss Emma DeMeret of Grimes couunty, whom he married in 1876, and who survives him, together with four sons and one daughter, William C., DeMeret, Selwyn, Felix C. and Ellen P. Smith, all of Fort Worth. He leaves two sisters, Mrs. John W. McGregor of Lilesville, N. C., and Mrs. Ida Willingham of Cleburne. Mrs. Willingham and hert son Smith, were present when the end came.
  • Last Edited: 6 Jul 2015

Family 1: Ellen Pegues b. 18 March 1846, d. 3 March 1870

Family 2: Emma Adele DeMaret b. 18 November 1846, d. 12 September 1940