Alexander Watkins Terrell

b. 3 November 1827, d. circa 8 September 1912

Alexander Watkins Terrell, 1827-1912

  • Alexander Watkins Terrell was born on 3 November 1827 in Patrick County, Virginia.
  • He accompanied Christopher Johnson Terrell and Susan Kennerly to Booneville, Cooper County, Missouri, in 1831.
  • He married Ann Elizabeth Bouldin, daughter of James E. Bouldin and Malinda L. Saunders, on 18 January 1849 in Howard County, Missouri.
  • Alexander Watkins Terrell and Ann Elizabeth Bouldin appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1850 in Washington, Buchanan County, Missouri. Other members of the household included Constance Terrell and Joseph Christopher Terrell.
  • He was a lawyer, according to the 1850 census.
  • Alexander Watkins Terrell and Ann Elizabeth Bouldin appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1860 in Austin, Travis County, Texas. Other members of the household included Constance Terrell, Mary Lee Terrell, Lilla Terrell, Ernest Terrell and Arthur J. Terrell.
  • He was a lawyer, according to the 1860 census.
  • Alexander Watkins Terrell became a widower at the 16 July 1860 death of his wife Ann Elizabeth Bouldin.
  • He married Sarah Douglass Mitchell, daughter of James L. Mitchell and Elizabeth H. Douglass, circa 1866.
  • Alexander Watkins Terrell and Sarah Douglass Mitchell appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1870 in Calvert PO, Robertson County, Texas. Other members of the household included Constance Terrell, Mary Lee Terrell, Lilla Terrell, Ernest Terrell, Arthur J. Terrell, Bettie Terrell and Howard Douglas Terrell. Constance also is enumerated with her husband Abner Cook in Travis County.
  • He was a farmer, according to the 1870 census.
  • Alexander Watkins Terrell became a widower at the 1871 death of his wife Sarah Douglass Mitchell.
  • Alexander Watkins Terrell appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1880 in Austin, Travis County, Texas, at Hickory Street.
  • He was a lawyer, according to the 1880 census.
  • He married Anne E. Holliday, daughter of Samuel Holliday and Attelia (?), in 1883.
  • Alexander Watkins Terrell and Anne E. Holliday appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1900 in Austin, Travis County, Texas, at 1010 San Jacinto Street.
  • Terrell County was formed from Pecos County in 1905 by act of the Texas Legislature. It was named for Texas Legislator and Civil War veteran A. W. Terrell. While Terrell helped pass the legislation that created the county, he never resided in it.
  • Alexander Watkins Terrell became a widower at the 1910 death of his wife Anne E. Holliday.
  • Alexander Watkins Terrell appeared in the US federal census of 15 April 1910 in Austin, Travis County, Texas, at Congress Avenue.
  • Alexander Watkins Terrell died circa 8 September 1912 in Mineral Wells, Palo Pinto County, Texas, while on the way home from visiting family in Virginia.
  • He was buried at Texas State Cemetery in Austin, Travis County, Texas.
  • The following appeared on 22 September 1912 in The Dallas Morning News: (Austin, Sept. 21) The will of A. W. Terrell was filed for probate in the County Court of Travis County this morning by the executors. It nominated Joseph Terrell, John L. Terrell and A. W. Terrell Jr., all of Fort Worth, as executors.
         The value of the estate is estimated at $45,000, consisting principally of property situated in Austin and Fort Worth. The bulk of the real estate is left in about equal proportions to his daughter, Mrs. Lilla Rector, and his granddaughter, Mrs. Constance James, both of Austin, and to his grandchildren, Alex W. Terrell of Panama and Mary Terrell of Fort Worth. The Morris mansion, just north of the Capitol, is left in trust for the benefit of Mrs. Constance James, Mary Terrell and Alex W. Terrell Jr., until Mary Terrell attains her majority, at which time it passes in fee simple to these parties. The residence property in Austin is left in trust for the benefit of Mrs. Lilla Rector, with a reversionary interest to Lilla Dashiell, a great-granddaughter.
         J. Bouldin Rector, a grandson, is named as trustee for the management of the property left to his daughter. A residence in Fort Worth is left to Mary Terrell, to be rented or sold and the proceeds applied to her education. One thousand dollars in cash is left to Howard D. Terrell, a son, of New Mexico. His library and reminiscences are left to J. Bouldin Rector, a grandson.
         The oil portraits of Gen. Sam Houston and Col. Frank Johnson are presented to the State University.
  • The following appeared on 9 March 1913 in the Albuquerque Morning Journal: (Roswell, N.M., March 2) Hon. Howard D. Terrell of Clovis, is here. Mr. Terrell, who is an applicant for the post of consul to Shanghai, stated yesterday that he had every reason to believe that he would land that very important office shortly after President-elect Wilson assumes the reins of government.
         It is said that Mr. Terrell has powerful influence both in Texas and New York as well as elsewhere, which will be brought to bear in his behalf and that this, coupled with his qualifications for the place, will, it is said, make his landing the plum comparatively easy.
         As is known, Mr. Terrell is the oldest son of the late Hon. Alexander Watkins Terrell, of Texas, author of the famous election law of that state and former envoy extraordinary and minister plenipotentiary to the court of Abdul Hamid II, sultan of Turkey, having been appointed to that post during the second administrtion of Grover Cleveland and retained there for the first eighteen months of the McKinley administration.
         Mr. Terrell said that his visit here had no special political significance other than to watch what the other boys were doing with regard to the New Mexico federal positions, which will soon be hanging on the hook.
  • For additional biographical information, see The Texas Handbook Online.
  • Last Edited: 25 Jan 2014

Family 1: Ann Elizabeth Bouldin b. 23 May 1829, d. 16 July 1860

Family 2: Sarah Douglass Mitchell b. circa 1845, d. 1871

Family 3: Anne E. Holliday b. November 1838, d. 1910