John Wesley Campbell

b. circa 5 December 1848, d. 11 January 1923

John Wesley Campbell, 1848-1923
  • John Wesley Campbell was born circa 5 December 1848 in Louisiana.
  • Clark Calhoun Campbell and Lucy Caroline Goree appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1850 in DeSoto Parish, Louisiana, enumerated next to Clark's mother and siblings.. Other members of the household included John Wesley Campbell, J. Goree Campbell.
  • Clark Calhoun Campbell and Lucy Caroline Goree appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1860 in Montgomery County, Texas. Other members of the household included John Wesley Campbell, J. Goree Campbell, Martha Campbell, Clark Calhoun Campbell Jr., Annie Campbell and Robert L. Wood. C. Campbell is listed in the 1860 Slave Schedule with 27 slaves (10 of whom were age 10 and younger) and 4 slave houses.
  • Clark Calhoun Campbell and Lucy Caroline Goree appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1870 in Galveston County, Texas, enumerated next to Clark's sister Eddie Williams. Clark also is enumerated at the Sisters of Charity Hospital. The family's out-of-town residence on Clear Creek in Galveston County was called "Rest Haven," according to daughter Lucie Campbell Lee.. Other members of the household included John Wesley Campbell, J. Goree Campbell, Martha Campbell, Clark Calhoun Campbell Jr., Annie Campbell and Lucie Frances Campbell.
  • He was a farm hand, according to the 1870 census.
  • From "Early Days in Luling": Do you remember that by the new year, 1874, most of the tent dwellers and bridge builders had moved to Dorn's Ford on the San Marcos? That the carpenters working overtime had finished many other store buildings and dwelling houses. That the post office had been opened. . . . Especially those families of Hardeman, Tadlock, Smith and others just out of the edge of the town. There were many single Men: . . . John Campbell. . .
  • From "Early Days in Luling": Do you remember that about the time the [Sooner's] railroad came to Luling. Josey's Store was a fine place to trade and young R. Jacobs was looking at the country with his pack on his back with the view of locating here? Copt. Kosiusko DeWitt Keith and his family came from Sabine Pass and started a lumber yard. The railroad brought supplies this side of Harwood to be brought on by wagon. Capt. Keith built for himself a four-room house where the Princess Theatre stands. Mrs. Keith and Miss Ida came on the stage while Wilbur and Sumter walked from Plum Creek, end of construction. Mrs. Keith opened a boarding house for some of the single men- among them Drs. J. Van Gasken, J. K. Moore, Dr. W. F. Blunt, Capt. Woodyard, John Campbell, Pic McKnight and his brother, Matt, and Frank Minnick.
  • He married Mary Ascora Hardeman, daughter of Thomas Monroe Hardeman and Susan Anna Burleson, on 3 September 1879 in Caldwell County, Texas, with B. Harris, MG, officiating.
  • John Wesley Campbell and Mary Ascora Hardeman appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1880 in Luling, Caldwell County, Texas, and also one servant.
  • He was a lawyer, according to the 1880 census.
  • On the south side of the railroad Mr. Coulter from Gonzales County built where Dick McGaffey now, lives and John Campbell, who had married Cora Hardeman, daughter of Gen. Gotch Hardeman, lived on the opposite of Seventh Avenue. . . . [from "Early Days in Luling"]
  • J. W. Campbell was appointed administrator of the estate of M. Hendry, deceased, on 7 November 1887, in Caldwell County, Texas.
  • The following appeared on 9 April 1889 in The Galveston Daily News: Mr. Marcus C. McLemore, Jr., son of Major M. C. McLemore and Mr. John W. Campbell, nephew of Mr. A. R. Campbell of the law firm of McLemore & Campbell, made application yesterday to the district court for licenses to practice law, and asking that an examination as to their qualifications be instituted for that purpose. And on another page, Ordered that the clerk issue certificates to Marcus C. McLemore, Jr., and to John W. Campbell respectively, that they are of good moral character and of honorable deportment, are over 21 years of age and residents of Galveston county.
  • John Wesley Campbell and Mary Ascora Hardeman appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1900 in Harris County, Texas.
  • He was a lawyer, according to the 1900 census.
  • John Wesley campbell and his wife Cora are were photographed with other unknown tourists at the foot of Seven Falls in South Cheyenne Canyon, near Colorado Springs.
  • John Wesley Campbell and Mary Ascora Hardeman appeared in the US federal census of 15 April 1910 in Houston, Harris County, Texas, at 1404 Lamar lodging in the household of T. J. Atwood.
  • He was a lawyer, according to the 1910 census.
  • John Wesley Campbell became a widower at the 29 December 1918 death of his wife Mary Ascora Hardeman.
  • John Wesley Campbell appeared in the US federal census of 1 January 1920 in Harris County, Texas, and one domestic servant.. Other members of the household included Sarah Patterson Campbell and Ann W. Campbell.
  • John Wesley Campbell appeared in the US federal census of 1 January 1920 in Houston, Harris County, Texas, at Washington Street. Other members of the household included Sarah Patterson Campbell and Ann W. Campbell. They were enumerated twice in Harris County in 1920, in different Enumeration Districts, but with some of the same neighbors (?)
  • He was a lawyer, according to the 1920 census.
  • John Wesley Campbell died on 11 January 1923 in Hillendahl, Harris County, Texas, . His death was officially witnessed by Lucie Frances Lee.
  • He was buried at Glenwood Cemetery in Houston, Harris County, Texas.
  • The following appeared on 13 January 1923 in The Galveston Daily News: (Houston, Jan. 12) Funeral services for Judge J. W. Campbell, 74 yreas old, will be held at 2:30 o'clock tomorrow afternoon from his residence in Hillendahl. Burial will be in Glenwood Cemetery and Dr. Charles Clingman will officiate.
         Judge Campbell died yesterday morning. For many years he was a practicing attorney in this county, but retired several years ago to give his attention to his oil interests. He had been a resident of Texas since he was an infant, his parents coming here from Alabama in 1849.
         Judge Campbell is survived by two daughters [sic], Mrs. C. K. Lee of Fort Worth and Mrs. Mattie Wren of the sme city. Settegast-Kopf Company have charge of the funeral arrangements.
  • Last Edited: 3 Apr 2015

Family: Mary Ascora Hardeman b. 3 August 1858, d. 29 December 1918