Charles Bellinger Tate Stewart

b. 6 February 1806, d. 2 July 1885

  • Charles Bellinger Tate Stewart was born on 6 February 1806 in Charleston, South Carolina.
  • He married Julia T. Shepperd, daughter of William Watters Shepperd and Mary Steptoe, on 11 March 1836 in Washington County, Texas, at the home of W. W. Shepperd on Lake Creek while C. B. Stewart was still serving as a delegate to the Convention at Washington.
  • Charles Bellinger Tate Stewart became a widower at the circa 1848 death of his wife Julia T. Shepperd.
  • Charles Bellinger Tate Stewart appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1850 in Montgomery County, Texas. Other members of the household included Charles Waters Stewart, Mary Stewart, Lucia Ann Boyd, Julia Arnold Stewart and Robert Stewart.
  • He was a farmer, according to the 1850 census.
  • He married Elizabeth Antoinette Nichols, daughter of Jefferson Nichols and Amelia Landrum, on 28 August 1851 in Walker County, Texas, with Elizabeth's uncle Sam Landrum, JP, officiating.
  • By deed dated 5 July 1852 in Walker County, Texas, Willis Breazeal Wood sold to Hamlin Freeman Lewis an 892-acre tract of land for the sum of $4,460, to be divided into three equal installments, the first of which ($1,486-2/3) was paid on 12 January 1853, the second and third due on the first day of January 1854 and 1855.
         As set forth by Willis B. Wood in a deed dated 23 February 1854, acknowledging the death of Hamlin Lewis, payment schedule was revised making the as yet unpaid second payment due at the time of the third payment, 1 January 1855, from the Estate of Hamlin Freeman Lewis, represented by his widow Mary M. Lewis. [Some additional language at the end of the deed referring to other individuals and financial aspects render the details of the transaction unclear.] Witnessed by S. B. Mayfield and S. Tarpley, notary public Charles B. Stewart, recorded 22 February 1855.
  • By deed dated 23 February 1854 in Walker County, Texas, Willis Breazeal Wood sold to the Estate of Hamlin Freeman Lewis represented by his widow Mary M. Lewis, a 460-acre tract of land, part of the Donation Claim James F. Winters purchased from Thomas Carothers, for the sum of $2,300. Witnessed by S. B. Mayfield and S. Tarpley, notary public Charles B. Stewart, recorded 20 February 1855.
  • Jesse McCaleb contracted to purchase from C. B. Stewart, on 2 January 1855, 131-1/3 acres in the James Edward League, which included a Boat Yard and Cotton Shipping Point, with rights of way having previously been granted to Green Wood, James M. Lewis, and Zill McCaleb.
  • Evelina Barnes Wood wrote on 5 March 1855, to her daughter Lizzie Powell, undergoing treatment for cancer in Murfreesboro, Tennessee: ". . . Mr Wettermark is here. he came to borrow Lizzie's guitar for a few days I have loaned it to him, he intends going to Houston to live in a week or two -- He says Dr Stewart received a letter and book from you to-day. . . . Mr Wettermark did not take the guitar as one string was missing and none to be had in Danville. . . ."
  • On 9 August 1855, Thomas Affleck wrote to Charles Bellinger Tate Stewart: "My Dear Sir: I have had yours of the 16th ult. before me for some days. But I am so busy! No news yet of Charley & Alfred. I begin to feel impatient. Yet it is a long & a rough route. . . . I believe I can find you a customer & perhaps a cash one, for your Montgomery farm. Are you willing I should make a penny by the operation if I can? I have had already two days infliction of a proposed buyer; & every day I have visitors, wanting information of Texas! I can influence hundreds! . . . With kind regards of Mrs. A. to yourself & Mrs. S."
         Addressed from Washington, Mississippi, to Danville, Texas. Transcription held at the Cushing Library, Texas A&M University, original collection at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge.
  • On 5 September 1855, Thomas Affleck wrote to Charles Bellinger Tate Stewart: "My Dear Sir: Yr two favors of 21st Augt. are to hand this morning. What a time it takes! I have made up my mind to go through myself with the gentleman I expect to sell yr farm to; leaving here about the 15th. I am sending out some hands to prepare for young nursery stock upon my place, & will be going round, about the 5th proxo., by Galveston &c; but this Mr. Case was going about the 5th (today) & I determined to hold on to him, if he would wait till 15th, which he had agreed to. Another friend goes with him. Mr. Case is a young Lawyer, who married a rich widow, an excellent woman. He has determined to remove to Texas, & has cash to buy with. He wants to be near to town where he can purchase, and she when she can have society & supply the markets with . . . [illegible]. . . . Charley is well & enjoying himself. He writes you today. I am very busy & must close for the present."
         Addressed from Washington, Mississippi, to Danville, Texas. Transcription held at the Cushing Library, Texas A&M University, original collection at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge.
  • On 28 January 1856, Thomas Affleck wrote to Charles Bellinger Tate Stewart: "My Dr Sir: I read yours of 15th inst. with extreme regret. But of course having nothing farther to say. We all like Charley. I would do anything in my power to advance him. Never heard him speak or hint the slightest disrespect of want of affection to you or yours. He seems oppressed, at times, with a feeling that he is alone in the world--but never speaks of it. I sent your letter to Charley. Told him to let me know how he was off for friends &c. before he left the college. His fees are paid to 1st May. It is a pity he could not have remained till then. How is he to travel? By what route? Has he funds? I urge him to obey you, strictly. But, at same time, I cannot see the boy start out without a dollar. I wait your reply more clear & connected than yr last. The trees for Col. Yokkum & Col. Wade, were addressed precisely as the order dictated me to do. They were entirely protected from the weather. We are all so-so, during this unprecedentedly cold winter. Almost frozen up!"
         Addressed from Washington, Mississippi, to Danville, Texas. Transcription held at the Cushing Library, Texas A&M University, original collection at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge.
  • On Monday, 18 February 1856, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: "Sowed 6 papers of Spanish spring wheat sent me by Dr Stew[art]."
  • On 12 April 1856, Thomas Affleck wrote to Charles Bellinger Tate Stewart: "My Dear Sir: I am some several letters in your debt. Amongst others, I owe you acknowledgement of $35. (thirty five dollars) to my credit with James Sorley, for Charlie's use. . . . Charley started--I forget the date--for So. Ca. But as $35. would not nearly pay his travelling expenses; & as he was absolutely in need of some clothes, & had had to incur some expenses arising from a pretty severe spell of sickness, I was forced to exceed what, I presume, would have been your wishes on the subject. After saving him every expense and outlay in my power, I had to exceed the amount in hand, including the $35, in all $55. But for business, & adding $15. to the amot. you sent ($35.) to pay his expenses, the amount for clothing, absolutely needful, shoes &c. wd. not have been great. I am perfectly aware of your expressed wishes--but I cold not see the lad suffer--& so let it rest. Although I do not approve of Charlie's conduct in writing the letters you speak of, & in other things of which I have since informed myself; but still I like Charley, & could have made an useful man of him, if you could have left him with me. As to your idea of his position in my family--why, Doctor, I thought you knew me & mine better. Charley has been, in no respect, treated otherwise than if he had been mine own. Your expressed idea on that [he had] hurt me, Dr. . . ."
         Addressed from Washington, Mississippi, to Danville, Texas. Transcription held at the Cushing Library, Texas A&M University, original collection at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge.
  • Charles Bellinger Tate Stewart became a widower at the 2 August 1857 death of his wife Elizabeth Antoinette Nichols.
  • Josephine Brooks Tainter wrote on 29 February 1860, to her aunt Evelina Barnes Wood: "Have the Spirits made any progress since I left? Has Dr Stewart been over to call them forth? You must write me all about it."
  • Charles Bellinger Tate Stewart appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1860 in Montgomery PO, Montgomery County, Texas, and merchant W. D. Westmoreland, age 21, and possibly his young wife and daughter, all of whose origins are yet unknown.
  • He was in general business, according to the 1860 census.
  • Josephine Brooks Tainter wrote on 16 January 1861, to her aunt Evelina Barnes Wood: "I hear that Uncle has become a firm believer in Spiritualism - Is this true? I suppose you have made great progress - since I was with you - I would like to look in upon you all, when you get seated around the table. You must write me all about it - I suppose Dr Stewart favors you with his presence occasionally."
  • On Wednesday, 27 April 1863, Green Wood recorded in his plantation daily account book: Sent Load of Oats to Doctor Stewart as a present."
  • Charles Bellinger Tate Stewart appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1870 in Danville PO, Montgomery County, Texas. Other members of the household included Edmund Bellinger Stewart, Charles Waters Stewart, Anna Lartigue Peeples, Nina S. Stewart and Rosa Louise Stewart.
  • He was a man of "sundry occupation," according to the 1870 census.
  • Charles Bellinger Tate Stewart appeared in the US federal census of 1 June 1880 in Montgomery County, Texas. Other members of the household included Edmund Bellinger Stewart. Also in the household was Dora Kile (age 33), and her two daughters Lucy (6) and Nannie (3).
  • Charles Bellinger Tate Stewart died on 2 July 1885 at age 79 in Montgomery County, Texas.
  • He was buried at the Montgomery "New" Cemetery in Montgomery, Montgomery County, Texas.
  • =====================
    Dr. Charles Bellinger Stewart was born 6 February 1806 in Charleston, South Carolina, and came to Texas in 1830. His name appears on the Montgomery County tax lists as early as 1840, and most histories erroneously place him only in the town of Montgomery. Dr. Stewart was a pharmacist and a physician, having received his medical license from the Mexican government in 1835. However, his primary means of support was as a land speculator. He was residing in the town of Montgomery in 1850. On 28 August 1851 he married Danville “instructress” Mrs. Antoinette Nichols Boyd, and apparently moved to Danville shortly thereafter. "Dr. C. B. Stewart" was "of Danville" in 1856, as mentioned in an advertisement for liniment that appeared in the State Gazette of 1 November 1856. Antoinette died in 1857 and was buried in the Old Danville Cemetery, after which Dr. Stewart moved back to Montgomery. In 1861, Stewart conveyed the title to his store and gin building in Danville with the stipulation that his shelving, boxes, medicines, bottles, irons, etc., remain under cover "until it is convenient for me to remove the same. . . ."
         Biographical sketch prepared by Karen McCann Hett as part of "Danville Doctors" for a future edition of the MCG&HS History of Montgomery County, Texas.
  • It is an educated guess that C. B. Stewart's sister was Elizabeth Adrianna Bull Stewart who married Jacque Etienne Latigue. Therefore, there appears to be some family connection between Charles W. Stewart and his wife Anna Lartique Peeples.
  • For additional biographical information, see The Texas Handbook Online.
  • Last Edited: 19 Sep 2014

Family 1: Julia T. Shepperd b. say 1815, d. circa 1848

Family 2: Elizabeth Antoinette Nichols b. circa 1822, d. 2 August 1857